[Met Performance] CID:100210
Tannhäuser {250} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/15/1928.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 15, 1928


TANNHÄUSER {250}

Tannhäuser..............Rudolf Laubenthal
Elisabeth...............Florence Easton
Wolfram.................Clarence Whitehill
Venus...................Julia Claussen
Hermann.................Richard Mayr
Walther.................Max Altglass
Heinrich................Max Bloch
Biterolf................Arnold Gabor
Reinmar.................James Wolfe
Shepherd................Editha Fleischer
Dance...................Mlle. Cecile [Debut and Only Performance]
Dance...................Lilyan Ogden
Dance...................Jessie Rogge

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review signed B. I. C. in unidentified newspaper

EASTON EXCELLS IN 'TANNHÄUSER' AT MET CONCERT

Supporting Cast Aids Star in Enacting Colorful Drama

The business of settling down to the beauties of Wagner's Prelude to the first act of "Tannhäuser," is a difficult one, with the steady stream of late-comers stepping over and around one, dropping opera glasses with a thud, getting in and out of the right or wrong seats, respectively, and whispering in a fortissimo which can be heard all over the house.

Just before the curtain parted upon the "Bacchanal," there seemed to be a succession of these sounds. And while we are on the subject of the "Bacchanal," it was the most virtuous we have ever witnessed, utterly devoid of any of the called-for sensualism, venalism or debauchery, but a beautiful tableau none the less.

We had as Tannhäuser, Rudolph Laubenthal, as unconvincing as it is possible to be, going through his usual round of eccentric poses reminiscent of a small boy just "acting" and emitting sounds which were far superior for him than usual.

The evening was noteworthy for the introduction of an Elisabeth, new for this season, acted by Florence Easton, who is never disappointing. She lends herself histrionically and picturesquely to every part. The "Dich, Teure Halle" of Elisabeth was sung with pure and flawless tone, and this was the most realistic moment of last night's entire production.

Edith Fleischer, as the young shepherd, added her charming bit.

For the spirit and climax of the opera, much is due to the unfailing Artur Bodanzky, who gave to the Prelude and Bacchanal a veritable symphony orchestra reading.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).