[Met Performance] CID:100830
Aida {335} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/29/1928.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 29, 1928


AIDA {335}
Giuseppe Verdi--Antonio Ghislanzoni

Aida....................Clara Jacobo
Radamès.................Frederick Jagel
Amneris.................Margarete Matzenauer
Amonasro................Giuseppe Danise
Ramfis..................Adamo Didur
King....................Joseph Macpherson
Messenger...............Giordano Paltrinieri
Priestess...............Charlotte Ryan
Dance...................Rita De Leporte

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Review of Charles D. Isaacson in the Telegraph

Jacobo in 'Aida' Wins

Without a doubt, Clara Jacobo made one of the most impressive interpreters of the Ethiopian maid we have ever encountered at the Metropolitan Opera, when last night she appeared in "Aida" at "popular prices." If the powers that be had chosen to present Miss Jacobo in this role at her debut, not only would that evening had been a success, as it was, but I am inclined to believe it would have proven a sensation.

This opinion of the "Aida" of last night is based chiefly on the interpretation Miss Jacobo gave. She made the Ethiopian girl seem plausible. The skin was rich brown. The manner of the girl was that of a slave, until she was aroused or forgot herself, and recalled her station in her own land, and in such moments the savagery was unfeigned.

Miss Jacobo has unquestionably used her intelligence in analyzing the character and then trust to her native temperament in carrying out her plan. It may be said that save for a tendency to scoop her lower notes to a point of throatiness and stiffness of jaw, her singing was brilliant. Not until last night has it seemed to me that Clara Jacobo had "big stuff" in her, and now verily I believe it.

As fine as Miss Jacobo's Aida, the truest and most acceptable characterization was that of Giuseppe Danise's Amonasro. Danise demonstrated his great art on this occasion as he had not done so far this season. His was a masterful creation. Danise showed that it is unnecessary for the Ethiopian King to go through the gyrations of a wild man of the circus. Danise knows that even a tribal chieftain has dignity, and he brought out the majesty of the savage warrior, while singing the difficult measures in such a way as to present a model for others.

Again the busy young American, Jagel, was Radames; Matzenauer, the familiar and standard Amneris of our recollections. Mr. Didur, a sturdy albeit a corduroy-voiced Ramfis, and Joseph Macpherson was the King.

The ballet danced as usual and Mr. Serafin, working as hard as ever, produced maximum results.



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