[Met Performance] CID:101630
Il Trovatore {167} Metropolitan Opera House: 02/25/1929.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
February 25, 1929


IL TROVATORE {167}
Giuseppe Verdi--Salvatore Cammarano

Manrico.................Giacomo Lauri-Volpi
Leonora.................Leonora Corona
Count Di Luna...........Giuseppe Danise
Azucena.................Marion Telva
Ferrando................Léon Rothier
Ines....................Minnie Egener
Ruiz....................Giordano Paltrinieri
Gypsy...................Arnold Gabor

Conductor...............Vincenzo Bellezza

Review of Pitts Sanborn in the New York Telegram

'Il Trovatore' Is Presented Before Metropolitan Patrons

Corona, Telva, Lauri-Volpi, Danise and Rothier Collaborate in Performance of Verdi's Popular Opera

Such glory as issued from the presentation of "Il Trovatore" at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening bestowed its aureoles upon the devoted heads of Messrs. Danise and Rothier. And, even so, report of the occasion will hardly go ringing down the ages in triumphant jubilation in a world without end.

Mr. Lauri-Volpi all but tipped over into the orchestral pit in the enthusiasm of his high C's - an enthusiasm that appeared to be shared chiefly by the claque. The tenor's vigorous voice sounded prevailingly dull, forced and raucous, and a catapultic mouthing of words was frequently his proffered substitute for legato phrasing.

The two chief ladies implicated in the evening's events were Miss Leonora Corona as the other Leonora, pride of the noble house of Guzman, and Miss Marion Telva, replacing Mme. Claussen, silenced by a cold in the vindictive duets of Azucena.

Miss Corona's long and clinging frocks were now of deepest orange dye, not of haughty black. Her singing (as it were) displayed its usual shrill vagaries, and her acting was pretty much here, there and everywhere. Miss Telva, for her part, shrouded the music of the implacable gypsy in a cloud of drab and tremulous tone.

Though by no means in the best vocal condition, Mr. Danise not only played the superb di Luna with authority, but sang his solos in excellent style, while Mr. Rothier, steadfast as Gibraltar's rock, proved a tower of strength as the Count's henchman.

Mr. Bellezza conducted as though in a hurry to get things over with, a point of view that must have been quite understandable to many of the assembled customers.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).