[Met Performance] CID:101720
Roméo et Juliette {152} Brooklyn Academy of Music, New York, Brooklyn: 03/2/1929.

(Review)


New York, Brooklyn
March 2, 1929


ROMÉO ET JULIETTE {152}

Roméo...................Edward Johnson
Juliette................Lucrezia Bori
Frère Laurent...........Léon Rothier
Stéphano................Jane Carroll
Mercutio................Lawrence Tibbett
Benvolio................Max Altglass
Gertrude................Henriette Wakefield
Capulet.................Louis D'Angelo
Tybalt..................Angelo Badà
Pâris...................Millo Picco
Grégorio................Paolo Ananian
Duke of Verona..........James Wolfe

Conductor...............Louis Hasselmans

Review of Edward Cushing in the Brooklyn Eagle

'Romeo et Juliette' Is Sung at the Academy

Like "La Bohème" and "Faust," Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette" is heard at the Academy of Music, if not every winter, at least more frequently than other diversions with which the Metropolitan Company visits Brooklyn. Dispatching our memory into the past, it returns to us with recollections of several "Romeos" attended at the Academy, cast very much as was the performance given last evening - with Mme. Bori and Mr. Johnson in the title roles, and with Mr. Rothier as Friar Laurent. In the old days Raymonde Delaunois sang the Stephano, whose voice yesterday was recognized as that of Jane Carroll, and Mercutio was not Lawrence Tibbett, but Mr. De Luca. So a little novelty was infused in the evening, though it was hardly needed.

"Romeo" is a pleasant entertainment of its type and there is good reason for its long retention in the repertory of the Metropolitan. Miss Bori and Mr. Johnson manage to enchant those scenes in which they appear so that one is willing to accept Gounod's music as better than it is. And yet, obvious and sentimental though the lyricism of the fourth and fifth acts may be, it flows easily without compulsion, and it has the specious ardor of conventional romanticism. Many operas with less virtue than this we are obliged to hear more often.

The performance last night was admirable with Miss Bori and Mr. Johnson in the cast, the eye no less than the ear was appeased. Both artists deserved the applause of the audience - Miss Bori, especially for her exquisite singing; Mr. Johnson, for the intelligence and grace of his impersonation. Mr. Tibbett also distinguished himself. The best Mercutio of who we know, he sang well and acted with skill. Miss Carroll was making her first appearance as Stephano. One of the season's debutantes, and a graduate of the revue, she presented herself with the poise lent by her past experience in another field than that of opera. The lesser roles were all equipped with capable artists, and Mr. Hasselmans conducted.



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