[Met Performance] CID:101780
La Rondine {7} Metropolitan Opera House: 03/7/1929.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 7, 1929


LA RONDINE {7}
Puccini-Adami

Magda...................Lucrezia Bori
Ruggero.................Beniamino Gigli
Lisette.................Editha Fleischer
Prunier.................Armand Tokatyan
Rambaldo................Pavel Ludikar
Yvette..................Charlotte Ryan
Bianca..................Philine Falco
Suzy....................Merle Alcock
Perichaud...............Millo Picco
Crebillon...............James Wolfe
Gobin...................Giordano Paltrinieri
Georgette...............Mildred Parisette
Gabrielle...............Phradie Wells
Lolette.................Dorothea Flexer

Conductor...............Vincenzo Bellezza

Director................Wilhelm von Wymetal
Designer................Joseph Urban

La Rondine received seven performances this season.

Review of Noel Straus in the New York World

'LA RONDINE'

So long as Lucrezia Bori adorns Puccini's lyric comedy, "La Rondine," in the title role, that opera promises to be a welcome component of the Metropolitan repertoire. Presented yesterday evening for the first time this season, the work was received with rapturous applause by a packed house.

Topping the excellent cast with which she had been associated since the initial production, Miss Bori gave a performance of eminence. Perhaps, of all the parts with which she is identified, none fits her talents quite so perfectly. Had Puccini written the score especially for her, it could hardly be more suited to the particular qualities of her vocal and histrionic equipment. Every phrase fell from her lips in lustrous clarity. And there was not a gesture or a pose that could seemingly be bettered in her graceful and delicate embodiment of Magda.

Miss Fleischer, who also rejoiced in a role that might have been conceived with her in mind, made a sparkingly vivacious Lisette. She gave of her best in song, and was delightfully diverting in her first act duet with Mr. Tokatyan, the agreeable Prunier of the evening. Mr. Gigli did not sink into his place in the picture as successfully as the rest of the principals, nor was he in his best voice. But he sang with his usual ardor and seldom indulged in forced tones. The lesser activities allotted to Rambaldo were capably performed by Mr. Ludikar. Mr. Bellezza conducted in magisterial fashion and did his share in making the big ensemble near the close of the second act culminate in a climax that brought on the most ample demonstration of the evening. All in all, the production remains one of the most gratifying and sumptuous of the company's present-day ventures.



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