[Met Performance] CID:101880
Götterdämmerung {103}
Ring Cycle [50]
Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 03/14/1929.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 14, 1929 Matinee


GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG {103}
Der Ring des Nibelungen: Cycle [50]

Brünnhilde..............Gertrude Kappel
Siegfried...............Lauritz Melchior
Gunther.................Friedrich Schorr
Gutrune.................Maria Müller
Hagen...................Michael Bohnen
Waltraute...............Karin Branzell
Alberich................Gustav Schützendorf
First Norn..............Merle Alcock
Second Norn.............Henriette Wakefield
Third Norn..............Dorothee Manski
Woglinde................Editha Fleischer
Wellgunde...............Phradie Wells
Flosshilde..............Marion Telva
Vassal..................Max Altglass
Vassal..................Arnold Gabor

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review of Herbert F. Peyser in the New York Telegram

'RING' COMES TO NOISY FINISH

'Götterdämmerung' Heard with Melchior as the Day's Mature Siegfried.

The gods went up in smoke and the accursed ring went back to the safe deposit yesterday afternoon in one of the noisiest performances of "Götterdämmerung" that ever disturbed the peace of Bayreuth-on-the-Subway. Mr. Bodanzky, who fourteen years ago came in like a lamb, seems determined to go out like a lion,. Even the estimable Alfred Hertz in his wildest paroxysms of dynamic fury never outdid this exhibition. Small wonder if some of the orchestral playing sounded mutinous. And, believe it or not, Mr. Bodanzky was once upon a time supposed to have made Wagner safe for gentility and singers!

On the farther side of the footlights the day's doings ranged from middling to bad. Some of the stage management would have shamed a troupe of provincial barnstormers. With a single exception the cast was the one which appears to have become standardized for the current purposes of Metropolitan "Götterdämmerungs." That exception was Lauritz Melchior, who placed on view yesterday a Siegfried whose lavish bulk affirmed his prosperous maturity, if not his heroism. Although the tenor's singing was, in some respects, rather better than a fortnight ago in "Die Walküre." His upper tones were once more hard as flint and invariably emitted with a rigid suppression of all nasal resonance.

Dramatically Mr. Melchior drew now and then on his Bayreuth experience and presented not a more colorable, but at least a somewhat more enlivening Volsung than has lately been the rule here. He climbed Brünnhilde's fire-girt rock reasonably disguised and colored his voice as the directions prescribe. But Siegfrieds at the Festspielhaus do not stand up and carry on unsupported by helping hands after receiving the death thrust, as Mr. Melchior did yesterday without visible compunction.

Mme. Kappel, singing badly, demonstrated again that she and the avenging Brünnhilde were never made for each other. Mme. Müller was a skittish Gertrune and Mme. Branzell a dull, inexpressive Waltraute. Mr. Schorr's Gunther resembled the incomparable one of Bayreuth's Josef Correck in its state of beardlessness, but not otherwise. Mr. Bohnen's Hagen was, as usual, everything that Wagner's Hagen is not.



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