[Met Performance] CID:101980
United States Premiere
Fra Gherardo {1} Metropolitan Opera House: 03/21/1929.
 (United States Premiere)
(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 21, 1929
United States Premiere


FRA GHERARDO {1}
Pizzetti-Pizzetti

Fra Gherardo............Edward Johnson
Mariola.................Maria Müller
Old Woman...............Ina Bourskaya
Squint-Eye..............Louis D'Angelo
Notary..................Giordano Paltrinieri
Blind Man...............Paolo Ananian
Gentleman...............Everett Marshall
Fairwoman...............Aida Doninelli
Angry Voice.............Henriette Wakefield
Woman's Voice...........Phradie Wells
Soldier.................Millo Picco
Soldier.................Fred Patton
Man.....................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Woman...................Phradie Wells
Guido...................Pavel Ludikar
Simone..................Angelo Badà
Antonio.................Ezio Pinza
Unbeliever..............Giordano Paltrinieri
Mother..................Julia Claussen
Mother..................Merle Alcock
Young Friar.............Marek Windheim
Bishop..................Mario Basiola
Guard...................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Podestà.................Ezio Pinza
Red-haired Man..........Louis D'Angelo
Youth...................Arnold Gabor
Podestà's Assessor......George Cehanovsky

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Director................Armando Agnini
Set designer............Joseph Urban

Fra Gherardo received received five performances this season.


Review of Lawrence Gilman in The New York Herald Tribune:

From the parting of the curtains upon Mr. Urban's conception of thirteenth century Parma to the end of the work was heard with respect. Of course, it was applauded - everything is applauded at the Metropolitan, even masterworks. But there is reason to wonder if the new piece brought unalloyed joy to many of its hearers. Pretty tunes have always been the justification of opera for the average man. But there are few of them in "Fra Gherardo" and it is a question if Pizzetti has supplied anything that is likely to take their place in the regard of the general opera goer.

There is not a doubt in the world that Pizzetti is a scholar and a good musician, that his musico-dramatic ideals are of the highest, that he has a poetic nature, strong convictions, intellectual sobriety. All this is admittedly to the good; but, alas, it has little to do with the creation of music. Pizzetti has given, in "Fra Gherardo," a score that is conspicuous for intellectual substance and ingenuity and fine craftsmanship. But none of these desirable qualities has enabled him to turn his aesthetic conscience into eloquence, or his seriousness into telling power, or his fineness of feeling into beauty. This music is essentially sterile. It is music of the will, of aesthetic piety, and good intentions.



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