[Met Performance] CID:110410
Tristan und Isolde {204} Matinee Broadcast ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 02/18/1932., Broadcast

(Broadcast (Act II)
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
February 18, 1932 Matinee Broadcast (Act II)


TRISTAN UND ISOLDE {204}

Tristan.................Lauritz Melchior
Isolde..................Gertrude Kappel
Kurwenal................Clarence Whitehill
Brangäne................Doris Doe
King Marke..............Michael Bohnen
Melot...................Arnold Gabor
Sailor's Voice..........Hans Clemens
Shepherd................Hans Clemens
Steersman...............James Wolfe

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

[On February 18, 1932, from 3-5 pm, Act II of Tristan und Isolde was broadcast]

Review of Pitts Sanborn in the World-Telegram

Isolde of Mme. Kappel Delights Large Audience

SHE CALLENGES COMPARISON WITH GREATEST SINGERS OF THAT ROLE, ESPECIALLY IN FIRST ACT - WHITEHILL WELCOMED IN RETURN TO METROPOLITAN

At the Metropolitan Opera House yesterday the annual matinee Wagner series proceeded with "Tristan und Isolde," presented to the evident pleasure of the large audience. Once more you felt the excellence of Mme. Kappel's Isolde, especially in the first act. In this act Mme. Kappel challenges comparison with the greatest Isoldes that have trod the Metropolitan stage, the Isoldes of Lilli Lehmann, Milka Ternina and Olive Fremstad.

Mme. Kappel's projection of the Irish princess is perhaps smaller in scale, but never does this singing actress try to exceed her natural limitations. Within the frame that she has wisely set for herself her impersonation could scarcely be surpassed. She has the temperament, the concentration, the dignity for the part, and she has evidently worked out her portrayal to the minutest details.

A Moving Embodiment

Her Isolde in Act I, thought not cast in quite the heroic mold, is a singularly fine, consistent and moving embodiment of the distressed bride of King Mark, and the richness and expressiveness of her low tones, as well as the breadth and poise of her phrasing, have much to do with its effectiveness. Mr. Melchior was by no means an ideal Tristan to behold, but the opulence of his tone and the amplitude of his style gave keep satisfaction.

It was a pleasure to welcome Mr. Whitehill on his return to the company, offering a Kurvenal of the authentic Wagnerian manner and proportion. Miss Doe, if rather a light-voiced and ingenue Brangäne, sang not a few phrases very beautifully indeed, and she had the further merit of changing the potions at the right time. Mr. Bohnen made, as always, a sympathetic King Mark, and Mr. Clemens brought a better voice to the songs of the young sailor than we usually hear in them.



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