[Met Performance] CID:112410
La Gioconda {128} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/21/1932.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 21, 1932


LA GIOCONDA {128}

La Gioconda.............Rosa Ponselle
Enzo....................Giacomo Lauri-Volpi
Laura...................Carmela Ponselle
Barnaba.................Armando Borgioli
Alvise..................Tancredi Pasero
La Cieca................Faina Petrova
Zune...................Alfredo Gandolfi
Ispo...................Giordano Paltrinieri
Monk....................James Wolfe
Steersman...............Pompilio Malatesta
Singer..................Alfredo Gandolfi
Singer..................Giordano Paltrinieri

Conductor...............Tullio Serafin

Review of W. J. Henderson in the Sun

Ponselle Sisters Sing In 'La Gioconda'

The human interest of the lyric news of last night was the joint appearance of the Ponselle sisters, Rosa and Carmella, in "La Gioconda" at the Metropolitan Opera House. Beyond this aforesaid human interest there was no matter of impressive import. Miss Carmella Ponselle is not entirely unknown to the town, though she is by no means as celebrated a personage as her august sister. But she has a voice of value, a strong and vibrant organ, well suited to the music of the role of Laura, which she sang last evening. She attacked her numbers with vigor and made her dynamic climaxes with courage and immediate response from the audience. She and her sister made the fire fly in their second act duet. We have heard it done with more style, but elegance and finish are at a discount in these days of speed and energy.

Rosa Ponselle was in her best voice last evening and sang admirably. Some of her achievements were of ravishing beauty. Mr. Lauri-Volpi, who once more wore the skirts of Enzo Grimaldo, was more discreet in his "Cielo e mar" than he had been at the previous performance, with the result that the famous old number acquired a greater value and gave more satisfaction to those who knew the traditions of Ponchielli's opera. The customers however, did not applaud him as loudly as they did at the first performance, when he sang more loudly.

The other members of the cast were those heard before. There is little to be said about them, except perhaps that Mr. Borgioli was a more evil Barnaba than he had been. Mr. Serafin conducted.



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