[Met Performance] CID:114170
Tristan und Isolde {215} Matinee Broadcast ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 01/6/1934., Broadcast

(Broadcast
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 6, 1934 Matinee Broadcast


TRISTAN UND ISOLDE {215}
Wagner-Wagner

Tristan.................Lauritz Melchior
Isolde..................Gertrude Kappel
Kurwenal................Friedrich Schorr
Brangäne................Doris Doe
King Marke..............Ludwig Hofmann
Melot...................Arnold Gabor
Sailor's Voice..........Hans Clemens
Shepherd................Hans Clemens
Steersman...............James Wolfe

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Director................Wilhelm Von Wymetal Jr.
Set designer............Joseph Urban
Costume designer........Mathilde Castel-Bert

Tristan und Isolde received seven performances this season.

Review of A. Walter Kramer in the January 25, 1934 issue of Musical America

First Tristan Brings Melchior Return and Doris Doe in Substitution

The season's first "Tristan und Isolde" given at the Saturday matinee of Jan. 6, despite a number of excellent features, was not an outstanding performance, due largely to the unevenness of the orchestra's playing under Mr. Bodanzky. Gertrude Kappel was the Isolde, singing much of the music capably, leaving something to be desired in her upper tones now and then. But her personation of the bride of King Mark is ever a sympathetic one. She was heartily welcomed when she came before the curtain alone.

Due to the illness of Karin Branzell, Doris Doe was called a few hours before the performance to sing Brangäne. Miss Doe's performance was one that may be praised warmly on its merit, vocally and histrionically (although in the latter respect she can still do much to improve her portrayal). When it is realized that she assumed the role without rehearsal, her achievement takes on added significance.

Lauritz Melchior as Tristan was, as ever, admirable, singing some of his third act music with a quality of tone, piano, that might be held up as a model for Wagner tenors. But the finest performance of the afternoon was that of Ludwig Hofmann as King Mark, one that strikes a note of pathos hardly to be described. Friedrich Schorr as Kurvenal is not at his happiest and vocally, on this occasion, his range was more limited than ever. Hans Clemens was, as usual, the Sailor's Voice and the Shepherd, James Wolfe, the Steersman and Arnold Gabor, the Melot.

Mr. Bodanzky's brass went to pieces again and again in Act I, most lamentably on the entrance of Tristan. Some day conductors will learn not to force the brass, especially the horns, who, when urged too much, always do what they did on this occasion, crack on every high note. The music of Act II seems to have less passion in Mr. Bodanzky's hands than in any other conductor's.



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