[Met Performance] CID:115100
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg {201} American Academy of Music, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 03/13/1934.

(Review)


Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
March 13, 1934


DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG {201}

Hans Sachs..............Ludwig Hofmann
Eva.....................Editha Fleischer
Walther von Stolzing....Max Lorenz
Magdalene...............Doris Doe
David...................Hans Clemens
Beckmesser..............Gustav Schützendorf
Pogner..................Emanuel List
Kothner.................Arnold Gabor
Vogelgesang.............Marek Windheim
Nachtigall..............Louis D'Angelo
Ortel...................Paolo Ananian
Zorn....................Angelo Badà
Moser...................Max Altglass
Eisslinger..............Giordano Paltrinieri
Foltz...................James Wolfe
Schwarz.................Arthur Anderson
Night Watchman..........Arnold Gabor

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Review in unidentified Philadelphia newspaper

METROPOLITAN OPERA

Wagner's "Die Meistersinger" Revived With an Excellent Cast

For the first time in several years the Metropolitan Opera Company brought 'Die Meistersinger" to the Academy last evening, and presented Wagner's great "comedy in music" with a cast that included a number of the leading artists in the company's contingent of German singers, with Artur Bodanzky doing notable work as conductor, his authority and sympathetic understanding as director of Wagnerian music again winning enthusiastic recognition. He demonstrated that, in the great "Ring" music dramas or in the lighter, though still elaborately constructed and brilliantly effective "Meistersinger" score, he is equally the master. The great overture, considerably disturbed as it was by the inevitable late-comers, was splendidly played and throughout the performance Bodanzky was authoritatively at the helm.

The performance was an excellent one, at times, reaching brilliant heights, notably in the beautifully staged festival scene finale which closes the opera, with the full force of the company in the ensemble. This probed the stirring climax of much fine chorus work, in which the group of apprentices was pleasantly in evidence, and the men's voices came out with especially fine effect.

'Die Meistersinger" is an entirely different Wagner from the librettist-composer of the "Ring," as it deals with real people and incidents, said to have a certain degree of historical foundation. There are no mythological heroes or impossible happenings, but instead the lyrical Walther von Stolzing, a decidedly genuine hero, who sings his way to victory as the suitor of the fair Eva in the famous "Preislied" (Prize Song), one of Wagner's supreme masterpieces of melodization, and, in fact, one of the 'gems" of all vocal music. The score of "Meistersinger" is one of the greatest examples of contrapuntal writing for voice and orchestra and in it Wagner achieved many magnificent effects, in solo, concerted numbers and chorus, all of which were admirably presented in last night's performance.

In last night's cast the Walther was Max Lorenz, a stalwart and vigorous hero, with a voice of excellent volume and fine resonance, if not particularly sympathetic quality. Mr. Lorenz, while a more lyric delivery at time would have been to advantage, did not fall far short of filling all requirements of the rôle, his delivery of the "Prize Song" being the high point of some excellent vocalism. Ludwig Hofmann was a noble Hans Sachs, in appearance and in the power and authoritative use of his fine bass, his scene with Gustav Schutzendorf, who gave a notable characterization of the conceited Beckmesser, ridiculous rival of Walther for the hand of Eva, in which the cobbler, seated at his workbench, ruins Beckmesser's attempted serenade to the fair one by pounding with his hammer, was a brilliant bit of comedy in both action and singing. Emanuel List, the new German basso, was an imposing Pogner, in person and in the rich, sonorous power of his voice, and Hans Clemens, as David, apprentice to Sachs, was clever in comedy portrayal and excellent vocally. Editha Fleischer was the Eva, looking attractive, acting well and singing fluently, although she has been heard to better advantage. Doris Doe made effective use of her opportunities as Magdalene, and others in the well balanced cast were Arnold Gabor, Marek Windheim, Angelo Bada, Max Altglass, Giordano Paltrinierei, Louis D'Angelo, Paolo Ananian, James Wolfe, and Arthur Anderson.



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