[Met Performance] CID:11870
Carmen {23} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/5/1894.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 5, 1894


CARMEN {23}

Carmen..................Emma Calvé
Don José................Jean de Reszke
Micaela.................Emma Eames
Escamillo...............Jean Lassalle
Frasquita...............Mathilde Bauermeister
Mercédès................Anita Ibles
Remendado...............Antonio Rinaldini
Dancaïre................Agostino Carbone
Zuniga..................Lodovico Viviani
Moralès.................Victor De Gromzeski
Dance...................Miss Santori

Conductor...............Luigi Mancinelli

Director................Armand Castelmary

Unsigned review in The New York Times

"Carmen" Heard by a Large Audience

The potent magnet to attract the public in the current season of grand opera at the Metropolitan Opera House is undoubtedly Bizet's noble music-drama, "Carmen." Some persons have fallen into the error of attributing the great success of the work this winter to the admirable impersonation of the title role of Mme. Calvé. A little thought and some recollection of the lessons taught by the last season of grand opera under the management of Messrs. Abbey & Grau ought to remove this misapprehension. Then it was Gounod's "Faust" which delighted the public, and was heard by large audiences. No one singer in the fine cast engaged in that work was credited with the attractive power. It was the "ideal" cast that drew the audiences.

In the present case there are four elements of success. First, there is the opera, a glorious masterpiece, brimming over with the precious fluid which flows from the fathomless fountains of genius. The New York public has come to love a truly dramatic opera, in which powerful emotions are voiced in lovely music. Second, there is a splendid cast. The present distribution of parts in this opera has never been excelled here, though it does not wholly efface memories of the days of Minnie Hauk, Alwina Valleria, Campanini, and Del Puente. Third, there is the conductor, whose masterly handling of the forces under his command compels constant admiration and leads to the happiest artistic results. And, fourth, there is the orchestra, which plays this work con amore like a little army of virtuosi. These four factors produce a noble result.

Last night the opera was again heard by a large and enthusiastic audience. Mme. Eames returned to the cast singing Micaela charmingly. Mme. Calvé, M. de Reszke. and M. Lassalle were all in good voice, and repeated the excellent performances which have already been heartily praised in these columns. This afternoon "Faust" will be sung.



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