[Met Performance] CID:120270
Lohengrin {408} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/11/1937.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 11, 1937


LOHENGRIN {408}
Wagner-Wagner

Lohengrin...............Lauritz Melchior
Elsa....................Kirsten Flagstad
Ortrud..................Marjorie Lawrence
Telramund...............Julius Huehn
King Heinrich...........Ludwig Hofmann
Herald..................George Cehanovsky

Conductor...............Maurice Abravanel

Director................Leopold Sachse
Designer................Joseph Urban

Lohengrin received ten performances this season.

Review of Winthrop Sargeant in the American

First 'Lohengrin' Of Season Sung At Metropolitan

Wagner's "Lohengrin" had its first performance of the season at the Metropolitan Opera House last night, and a considerably altered and refurbished ""Lohengrin" it was from the point of view of staging. The hand of Leopold Sachse was evident in the greater mobility of the choral scenes and in other matters that added credibility to one of the most incredible of theatrical spectacles.

Kirsten Flagstad was once more the principal center of interest as Elsa of Brabant. In the [early] sections of the opera the Norwegian soprano gave a slight impression of fatigue. But as the first act progressed her voice warmed, and by the end of it she was singing with the customary inexhaustible power. Hers was, as usual, an Elsa of sensitive characterization and warm and pliant vocal style. The song on the balcony at the beginning of the second act provided a scene of breathtaking mood.

Lauritz Melchior was in particularly good voice and got through the heroics of the first act with reasonably presentable stage demeanor. Ludwig Hofmann was an impressive King Henry.

The second act brought some convincing drama and some acceptable singing from Marjorie Lawrence and Julius Huehn, the sinister and conniving Ortrud and Telramund. Despite evidences of strain on a few of her upper notes, Miss Lawrence gave a reading of impressive power.

It is perhaps too much to ask that the quintet at the close of Act I be sung in tune. It was not, and long established tradition thus remained inviolate. Nor was the singing of the male chorus in the same act innocent of some lapses in pitch.

Maurice de Abravanel, making his first Metropolitan appearance as a conductor of German opera, gave the score a sensitive and restrained interpretation. The participants were hailed before the curtain many times by the large audience at the close of each act.



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