[Met Performance] CID:128310
Tannhäuser {316} Metropolitan Opera House: 03/8/1940.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 8, 1940


TANNHÄUSER {316}

Tannhäuser..............Carl Hartmann [Last performance]
Elisabeth...............Kirsten Flagstad
Wolfram.................Herbert Janssen
Venus...................Kerstin Thorborg
Hermann.................Alexander Kipnis
Walther.................John Carter
Heinrich................Anthony Marlowe
Biterolf................Douglas Beattie
Reinmar.................John Gurney
Shepherd................Maxine Stellman
Dance...................Ruthanna Boris
Dance...................Monna Montes
Dance...................Lillian Moore
Dance...................Beatrice Weinberger
Dance...................Doris Neal
Dance...................Ruth Harris
Dance...................Grant Mouradoff
Dance...................George Chaffee

Conductor...............Erich Leinsdorf

Review of Howard Taubman in The New York Times


HARTMANN SINGS IN "TANNHÄUSER"

German Tenor Makes First Appearance of the Season -Escaped the Blockade

FLAGSTAD AS ELISABETH

Janssen Replaces Tibbett, Who Is Ill, as Wolfram-Kipnis the Landgraf Hermann


Carl Hartmann, the German tenor, made his first appearance of the season in the title role of Tannhäuser at the Metropolitan Opera House last night. Mr. Hartmann was not expected here at all this season, but he chanced the trip from Germany and, unlike another German tenor who was taken off an Italian ship and sent to a French prison camp, he arrived here safely.

Mr. Hartmann, of course, is no newcomer. He appeared at the Metropolitan in the two seasons before this, and his repertory runs the Wagnerian gamut. His performance last night had the assurance of a man who knows the routine of the role. Vocally he did not rise to stirring heights. His singing at times was smooth and agreeable; at others it was forced, white and even off pitch. If Mr. Hartmann were not to attempt utterance of tremendous sweep and volume; if he were to strive for a sustained line within a smaller compass, he might harness his powers to more arresting effect.

Kirsten Flagstad, who seems to sing almost every night - if not in the opera house, in the concert hall - was the Elisabeth. She sang with unsparing tonal opulence, as if she had been resting for weeks. Her conception of this role, which somewhat eluded her in the past, has deepened and become more poignant. Joining her in poised and musicianly performances were Kerstin Thorborg as Venus, Alexander Kipnis as Landgraf Hermann and Herbert Janssen as Wolfram. Mr. Janssen took the place of Lawrence Tibbett, who was indisposed.

The cast was rounded out by John Carter, Douglas Beattie, Anthony Marlowe, John Gurney and Maxine Stellman. Erich Leinsdorf, who is on a marathon of his own and who was conducting his fourth major opera of the week with the fifth to follow tonight, seemed to be tired; at least that is how the orchestra sounded at times.



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