[Met Performance] CID:130210
Tristan und Isolde {286} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/19/1940.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 19, 1940


TRISTAN UND ISOLDE {286}

Tristan.................Lauritz Melchior
Isolde..................Kirsten Flagstad
Kurwenal................Julius Huehn
Brangäne................Karin Branzell
King Marke..............Emanuel List
Melot...................Emery Darcy
Sailor's Voice..........Emery Darcy
Shepherd................Karl Laufkötter
Steersman...............John Gurney

Conductor...............Erich Leinsdorf

Review of Irving Kolodin in the Sun

Flagstad and Melchior Sing Familiar Roles

So far as the evening subscribers are concerned, the Metropolitan continued to observe an unofficial Erich Leinsdorf week last night. In succession to the performance of "Walküre" and "Rosenkavalier" which had been heard earlier in the week, Mr. Leinsdorf led his untiring orchestra through the formidable lengths of "Tristan und Isolde." His principal collaborators were, as many times in the past, Kirsten Flagstad and Lauritz Melchior, with Karin Branzell, Julius Huehn and Emanuel List as the trio of unfortunates who revolve about them.

After the previous night's "Rosenkavalier" Mr. Leinsdorf's intent and flexible direction of this score was evidence that the disappointing performances of "Walküre" in the first week was merely a transitory happening. Mme. Flagstad was in splendid voice for this performance, enhancing the truth and sensitivity of her conception with many fine vocal details. For that matter, it may be remarked that Mr. Melchior is by now the classic Tristan of Metropolitan history, for this thirteenth season of his activity is a rarity in the institution's records. This performance was sturdily sung, with consistent vocal mastery.

The Brangäne was again Karin Branzell, in somewhat better vocal condition than she was last week. However, the top of her voice is more burdened by the necessities of the first act that in the past. Mr. Huehn was an able Kurvenal and Mr. List exchanged the buffoonery of Ochs for the lament of Marke with artful ease. The audience was large and devotedly attentive.



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