[Met Concert/Gala] CID:13060
Gala Performance. Metropolitan Opera House: 04/27/1894.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 27, 1894


GALA PERFORMANCE


ROMÉO ET JULIETTE
: Act III

Roméo...................Jean de Reszke
Juliette................Emma Eames
Laurent.................Edouard de Reszke
Gertrude................Mathilde Bauermeister

Conductor...............Luigi Mancinelli


CARMEN: Act II

Carmen..................Emma Calvé
Don José................Fernando De Lucia
Escamillo...............Jean Lassalle
Frasquita...............Mathilde Bauermeister
Mercédès................Anita Ibles [Last appearance]
Remendado...............Antonio Rinaldini
Dancaïre................Agostino Carbone
Zuniga..................Lodovico Viviani

Conductor...............Enrico Bevignani

[Note: M. Lassalle repeated the Toreador Song.]


Dinorah: Ombre légère
Sigrid Arnoldson

Conductor...............Enrico Bevignani

[Note: Arnoldson sang an unidentified encore.]


Bretón: Addio
Sofia Scalchi

[Note: Scalchi sang an unidentified encore.]


WERTHER: Act III

Werther.................Jean de Reszke
Charlotte...............Emma Eames
Sophie..................Sigrid Arnoldson [Last performance]

Conductor...............Luigi Mancinelli


AIDA: Act III

Aida....................Lillian Nordica
Radamès.................Francesco Vignas [Last performance]
Amneris.................Olimpia Guercia [Last performance]
Amonasro................Jean Lassalle
Ramfis..................Lodovico Viviani

Conductor...............Enrico Bevignani


HAMLET: Mad Scene
Bishop: Clari: Home sweet home (encore)
Nellie Melba

Conductor...............Enrico Bevignani


Director................Armand Castelmary

Review and Account of W. J. Henderson in The New York Times

OVATION TO THE SINGERS

REMARKABLE SCENE AT THE METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE

Mmes. Eames, Calvé, Melba, Arnoldson, Scalchi and Nordica, the Brothers de Reszke, and M. Lassalle Recalled Time and Again and Almost Buried Under Bouquets on the Closing Night of the Season - Calvé Says Good-Bye.

The last night of the opera was a genuine fête. The auditorium of the Opera House was packed last evening to its utmost capacity. The number of persons who stood up was so great that it was almost impossible to get in or out of the house after the performance had once begun. Society was out in full force and the boxes gleamed with satin and glittered with jewels. Flowers were present in profusion, and it was evident that everyone had come prepared to indulge in one final outpour of enthusiasm. The Vaudeville Club crowded its omnibus box, on the left of the auditorium, and some of its members must have sore arms today from throwing flowers.

The evening's entertainment began with the wedding scene from Gounod's "Romeo et Juliette," introducing Mme. Eames as Juliette, Mlle. Bauermeister as the Nurse, M. Jean de Reszke as Romeo, and M. Edouard de Reszke as Friar Lawrence. The audience received each artist with hearty applause, especial favor being shown to Edouard de Reszke and Mme. Eames. The scene was sung with excellent spirit by all concerned, and the declamatory passage in unison at the end made its customary effect. As soon as the curtain fell the pent-up enthusiasm burst forth. The singers were recalled again and again-in fact, six times. Mme. Eames received four large and beautiful bunches of roses, Jean de Reszke got three wreaths, and his brother four. They were large wreaths, and they went whirling on the stage with great speed. The big basso looked particularly happy at the especial favor shown to him.

The curtain was down but a. few minutes before it arose on the second act of "Carmen." Applause broke out the moment Mme. Calvé was discovered on the stage. She was in fine spirits, and she actually skylarked with some of her associates on -the stage. The other members of the cast were Signor de Lucia as Don José, M. Lassalle as Escamillo, Mlle. Bauermeister and Mlle. Ibles as the two gypsy girls, Signor Carbone as Il Dancairo, Signor Rinaldini as Remendado, and Signor Viviani as Zuniga. Strange to say, the only person out of voice was Signor Rinaldini, who amusingly apologized for himself in pantomime.

Of course M. Lassalle had to sing the toreador song twice. At the close of the act the enthusiasm was tremendous. It began as soon as Mme. Calvé sang her [first] measures, when three bouquets flew to the stage, and one of them hit the prima donna on the head. She was considerably surprised, but at the end of the act she was quite amazed. She was called out just twelve times. Bouquets simply rained down on her, and she kept Signor de Lucia running to help her carry them away. Finally, in response to emphatic demands, she made a brief speech. She said in French:

"I shall never forget that to the American public I owe the greatest success of my artistic career. I hope that I am not saying good-bye, but only au revoir." After that she was called out several more times and cheered.

An intermission followed, in which some of - the members of the company appeared in concert. M. Plançon was to have sung Schumann's "Two Grenadiers," but he was indisposed, and this air was omitted. Mme. Sigrid Arnoldson sang the shadow song from "Dinorah," and received half a dozen bouquets and an immense basket, which she removed from the stage by dragging it. She was obliged to sing an additional number. Then came Mme. Scalchi with an aria di bravura by Berton, and after four recalls she also sang a second number.

The next thing on the programme was the third act of "Werther," in which Jean de Reszke appeared as the hero, Mme. Eames as Charlotte, and Mme. Arnoldson as Sophie. The enthusiasm after this act was deafening. Bouquets fell upon the stage in an avalanche, and Jean de Reszke received an enormous wreath. The artists were called out eight times before Mme. Eames responded to the cries for a speech. She said:

"Ladies and Gentlemen: I wish to thank you for myself and my comrades for all your kindness to us, and to tell you that we are very sorry to say good-bye to you."

Half a dozen more calls followed, and then the whole house called for a speech from M. de Reszke. He looked very much confused, but finally managed to say in French:

"I can only repeat the words of my charming companion, Mme. Eames, and thank you for your kindness. I hope it is not goodbye, but only au revoir."

The next number on the bill was the third act of "Aida," the splendid scene before the temple. The singers were Mme. Nordica, as Aida, Mlle. Guercia as Amneris, M. Lassalle as Amonasso, Signor Viviani as Ramfis, and. Signor Vignas as Rhadames. Mme. Nordica's singing of "Patria mia " called forth the warmest applause and the two great duets aroused the house to hearty demonstrations of delight. There was another scene of enthusiasm after the curtain was down, and the artists were called out over a dozen tithes and loaded with flowers.

The final number on the bill was the mad scene from "Hamlet " by Mme, Melba; After several recalls she brought out Messrs. Abbey and Grau, and in response to further calls she sang "Home, Sweet Home."



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