[Met Performance] CID:131730
Faust {431} Municipal Auditorium, Atlanta, Georgia: 04/29/1941.

(Review)


Atlanta, Georgia
Municipal Auditorium
April 29, 1941


FAUST {431}

Faust...................Charles Kullman
Marguerite..............Helen Jepson
Méphistophélès..........Ezio Pinza
Valentin................Richard Bonelli
Siebel..................Helen Olheim
Marthe..................Thelma Votipka
Wagner..................Arthur Kent
Dance...................Lillian Moore
Dance...................Josef Levinoff

Conductor...............Wilfred Pelletier

Review of Eugenia Bridges Harty in the Atlanta Constitution

Opera "Faust" Rare Treat to Sellout Crowd

Second 'Met' Performance Surpasses First

The most glamorous "Marguerite" in Atlanta's operatic history succumbed to the witchery of a beguiling "Devil" last night in the second performance of the Metropolitan Opera Company at the city auditorium, sold out for months in advance for Gounod's "Faust."

The brilliant cast, commanded from Wilfred Pelletier's magic podium, brought an excited audience the stirring strains of the "Star Spangled Banner" for the first course.

The Metropolitan's second performance far surpassed the first night's promise. Helen Jepson, as the heroine of Goethe's immortal legend, also went to Heaven in the hearts of native music-lovers, while the realistic and virile singing of Ezio Pinza, as Mephistopheles, inspired repeated acclaim, as did Charles Kullman's smooth handling of the title role, in which he showed new skill.

As Mr. Kullman had only been heard before locally in concert, his fans were unprepared for his fine dramatic ability. His voice was warm and true, and his high notes expertly sustained in the many beautiful arias. His duet with Miss Jepson in the second act seemed to have inspired the singers as it did their listeners.

In addition, the "Faust" fans had three delightful surprises in the supporting cast. For Helen Olheim's exquisite voice reliably cloaked the role of Siebel, while Richard Bonelli, as Valentin, won an appropriate ovation. Thelma Votipka also used the part of Marthe to give ample expression to her many talents.

And what the boss of the big show (Edward Johnson) called "an intelligent, good-looking and well-dressed audience," gave them all a lavish hand. Gratefully the old-timers gazed at colorful sets, becoming costumes and at Faust's perfect Marcel wave. The twin blues of the hero and heroine's outfits were as easy on the eyes as were their wearers.

The chorus work was well done both vocally and dramatically, with the ballet adding an extra bit of "gala" to the evening. Lillian Moore and Joseph Levinoff (the latter having proved his prowess at the rumba Monday night) were the competent leaders of the dance.



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