[Met Performance] CID:133460
Der Rosenkavalier {84} Metropolitan Theatre, Boston, Massachusetts: 03/27/1942.

(Review)


Boston, Massachusetts
March 27, 1942


DER ROSENKAVALIER {84}

Octavian.....................Jarmila Novotna
Princess von Werdenberg......Lotte Lehmann
Baron Ochs...................Emanuel List
Sophie.......................Eleanor Steber
Faninal......................Julius Huehn
Annina.......................Irra Petina
Valzacchi....................Alessio De Paolis
Italian Singer...............John Carter
Marianne.....................Thelma Votipka
Mahomet......................Sari Montague
Princess' Major-domo.........Emery Darcy
Orphan.......................Lucielle Browning
Orphan.......................Maxine Stellman
Orphan.......................Mary Van Kirk
Milliner.....................Annamary Dickey
Animal Vendor................Lodovico Oliviero
Hairdresser..................Michael Arshansky
Notary.......................Gerhard Pechner
Leopold......................Ludwig Burgstaller
Coachman.....................John Gurney
Musician.....................Wilfred Engelman
Faninal's Major-domo.........John Dudley
Innkeeper....................John Dudley
Police Commissioner..........John Gurney

Conductor....................Erich Leinsdorf


Review of Warren Storey Smith in the Boston Post

Richard Strauss' brilliant, captivating "Der Rosenkavalier" proved last evening one of the very best offerings of the current season of Metropolitan Opera at the Metropolitan Theatre. Indeed, if we ever hear a better "Rosenkavalier" than this one we will be very lucky.

AN IDEAL CAST

At the head of an almost ideal cast was Lotte Lehmann, the finest Marchallin that the American stage has known. Surpassing his previous efforts in that part was Emanuel List, as Baron Ochs. In Jarmila Novotna the performance gave us a new Octavian and one who in most respects fitted perfectly the musical and dramatic requirements of the role. The only possible complaint was that Miss Novotna's voice was not quite dark enough to contrast with those of Lotte Lehmann and Eleanor Steber.

The last named, Boston-trained singer had last evening her first important assignment and, as Sophie she covered herself with glory. Her impersonation had the requisite charm and, after a somewhat uncertain beginning, she sang the music beautifully. In particular was her voice admirably suited to the lovely soaring phrases of the first duet with Octavian. And it should be added that the voices of the three women combined in a most ravishing performance of the final trio.

CAPABLE MEN SINGERS

To turn to the other men singers, Julius Huehn was again a capital Faninal, and Mr. De Paolis, abetted by his sidekick Irra Petina as Annina, presented an excellent Valzacchi. To go on through the long cast would take too long, so it must suffice to commend the production as a whole in both its larger and smaller details. Incidentally, the Metropolitan Theatre, filled virtually to capacity by a most enthusiastic audience, provided a perfect setting for this rather intimate opera.

Neither in "Lohengrin" nor in "Die Walkuere" did Erich Leinsdorf make the impression as conductor that he made last evening in directing this so grateful and rewarding score. Perhaps he is Strauss' man rather than Wagner's. In any event, he not only displayed a vast enthusiasm for his task but he directed a performance that seemed to miss none of the myriad opportunities of the music, a performance as notable for subtlety as for sweeping eloquence, for humor as for sentiment.

The lilting waltzes which creep in and out of the score were fascinatingly rhythmed. Of course, what Mr. Leinsdorf accomplished was very largely dependent upon the superb cooperation that he received from his orchestra, which has quite consistently outdone itself in this engagement.



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