[Met Performance] CID:137540
Faust {447} Matinee Broadcast ed. Boston Opera House, Boston, Massachusetts: 04/15/1944., Broadcast

(Broadcast
Review)


Boston, Massachusetts
April 15, 1944 Matinee Broadcast


FAUST {447}

Faust...................Raoul Jobin
Marguerite..............Licia Albanese
Méphistophélès..........Ezio Pinza
Valentin................Martial Singher
Siebel..................Lucielle Browning
Marthe..................Thelma Votipka
Wagner..................John Baker

Conductor...............Thomas Beecham

Review of Warren Storey Smith in the Boston Traveler

FINE "FAUST" PERFORMANCE

Conducting by Beecham One of Features

In three respects the Metropolitan's performance of "Faust" at the Opera House yesterday afternoon was altogether remarkable. In others it was good enough to add up to a representation of Gounod's work so far above the average that those who were permitted to see and hear it are not likely to forget it.

These three outstanding features were the conducting of Sir Thomas Beecham, made known to us two years ago, the Mephistopheles of Ezio Pinza, of which we were then deprived, and the Valentin of Martial Singher, which this year was something new both in New York and Boston. To speak of him first, the French baritone, a singer and actor of rare powers, came close to making Valentin the hero of the piece. In considering what Valentin usually is, you can't say much more than that, unless to add that, thanks to him, the end of the third act was transformed into a dramatic thriller.

Mr. Pinza's Mephistopheles has the authority of that of Chaliapin, without, however, stepping outside its proper frame. And his is by far the better voice. As for Sir Thomas, his vitalizing of Gounod's score is something that must be heard to be believed. And it was not all a matter of vitality, either; there were orchestral moments of ravishing beauty and climaxes that made you decide Gounod was quite a pretty fellow, after all.

Raoul Jobin, who portrayed Faust here, for the first time, is not much of an actor, but he sang divinely, and if Licia Albanese's Marguerite is a bit on the pallid side, it had its moments. Thelma Votipka's Marthe and John Baker's Wagner were sharply characterized, and Lucielle Browning contributed a credible Siebel. If the production followed the older tradition, it still made a brave show.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).