[Met Performance] CID:139450
Lucia di Lammermoor {210} Matinee ed. Boston Opera House, Boston, Massachusetts: 04/7/1945.

(Review)


Boston, Massachusetts
April 7, 1945 Matinee


LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR {210}

Lucia...................Patrice Munsel
Edgardo.................Jan Peerce
Enrico..................Leonard Warren
Raimondo................Nicola Moscona
Normanno................Lodovico Oliviero
Alisa...................Thelma Votipka
Arturo..................John Garris

Conductor...............Cesare Sodero

Review of Cyrus Durgin in the Boston Herald

"Lucia di Lammermoor"

Yesterday's matinee of "Lucia di Lammermoor" was an "occasion." In the title role Patrice Munsel made her local debut earlier than planned, due to the absence in France of Lily Pons.

Miss Munsel is still under 20 which is very young to be singing leading roles at the Metropolitan. In addition to her vocal gifts, she has two other important qualifications: beauty and a nice figure. For once the bride of Lammermoor looks like a bride.

So far as the adoring public is concerned, Miss Munsel has arrived. Yet actually she is a most promising young singer rather than a matured artists. Her voice is clear, agile and flexible though small. She sings fioratura accurately; she phrases well, though her manner of breathing sometimes will break phrases. Her lower tones are not fully developed and her trill needs improvement.

At her age, Miss Munsel has made brilliant progress. If she is not overworked so that her pleasant vibrato widens into a tremolo, if she studies and attains that final authoritative polish in style and technic, she will become a remarkably fine artist.

All in all, the Metropolitan made a good show out of Donizetti's tuneful and violent opera which, for richer or poorer, in sickness and in health, will always be a lovely opera with at least one terrifying moment; here it is at the beginning of the famous Sextet which yesterday went off fairly well.

Apart from Miss Munsel, the singing varied in merit and accurate pitch. Mr. Warren's Henry Ashton took the male honors for its vocal and dramatic virility. Mr. Peerce gave a well-routined account of Edgar, reaching genuine pathos in the final scene. Mr. Sodero kept the show moving at a lively pace.



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