[Met Performance] CID:146200
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg {248} Matinee Broadcast ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 11/29/1947., Broadcast

(Broadcast
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 29, 1947 Matinee Broadcast


DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG {248}

Hans Sachs..............Herbert Janssen
Eva.....................Polyna Stoska
Walther von Stolzing....Torsten Ralf
Magdalene...............Margaret Harshaw
David...................John Garris
Beckmesser..............Gerhard Pechner
Pogner..................Dezsö Ernster
Kothner.................Mack Harrell
Vogelgesang.............Thomas Hayward
Nachtigall..............Hugh Thompson
Ortel...................Osie Hawkins
Zorn....................Leslie Chabay
Moser...................Lodovico Oliviero
Eisslinger..............Emery Darcy
Foltz...................Lorenzo Alvary
Schwarz.................Jerome Hines
Night Watchman..........Philip Kinsman

Conductor...............Wolfgang Martin

[The broadcast was not complete.]

Review of Irving Kolodin in the Sun

An impressive Eva by Polyna Stoska

Of an even score of musical events over the weekend there was easily the most virtue in a matinee performance of "Meistersinger" at the opera house on Saturday in which Polyna Stoska sang Eva for the first time. Considering how recently Miss Stoska was singing nightly in a Broadway show, her accomplishment was little less than remarkable.

She was appealing in the first act, a little tentative in the second, but triumphant in the third, where she delivered the workshop scene with Sachs more meaningfully than any Eva since Lotte Lehmann. The voice has ring and impact, also lyric suavity; some facts which Miss Stoska might well accept without further concern in the future. Since her Eva is a heart-breaker from her first appearance, and Miss Stoska adds intelligent action to her natural endowment, she should be the standard at the house for quite a while to come.

The cast was otherwise as it was previously, though almost every one sang better: beginning with Herbert Janssen, whose Sachs was vocally magnificent; John Garris, a choice David; Margaret Harshaw, an able Magdalene; and Deszo Ernster, a constantly improving Pogner. Gerhard Pechner's Beckmesser is also first class. Wolfgang Martin conducted unobtrusively, which is no virtue in this score.



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