[Met Performance] CID:147700
Cavalleria Rusticana {336}
Pagliacci {375}
Fair Park Auditorium, Dallas, Texas: 04/10/1948.

(Review)


Dallas, Texas
April 10, 1948


CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA {336}

Santuzza................Regina Resnik
Turiddu.................Mario Berini [Last performance]
Lola....................Martha Lipton
Alfio...................John Brownlee
Mamma Lucia.............Claramae Turner

Conductor...............Giuseppe Antonicelli


PAGLIACCI {375}

Nedda...................Dorothy Kirsten
Canio...................Frederick Jagel
Tonio...................Leonard Warren
Silvio..................Hugh Thompson
Beppe...................Leslie Chabay

Conductor...............Giuseppe Antonicelli


Review of Clyde Whitlock in the Fort Worth, Texas Star-Telegram

Metropolitan Opera Ends Season With Double Bill

With the traditional and seldom separated double bill the seventh season of Metropolitan Opera presentations in Dallas ended Saturday night with the excitement which the melodramatic "Pagliacci" engenders.

When the season was announced there was much dissatisfaction about the choice of operas promised. But, as nearly always happens, whenever the most familiar and supposedly worn-out piece comes to performance, it takes on new glamour.

Especially with regard to the perennial "double feature" of opera there was much complaint. Yet, so superbly cast were they, so thrillingly played and so lavishly produced, that we retracted criticisms.

It was not generally remarked that, with but two exceptions, both operas were sung by all American casts. There were replacements, caused by the illnesses. Frederick Jagel was transferred from "Cavalleria" to "Pagliacci," in place of Kurt Baum. Mario Berini took Jagel's place in "Cavalleria," and Dorothy Kirsten replaced Florence Quartararo.

The lurid melodrama of both operas was entrusted to well-nigh ideal casts. The powerful voice, the physical force and the over-acting of Miss Resnik befitted the role of the sorely distraught girl.

Martha Lipton was a voluptuous and insolent Lola, and Berini, both in brilliance of tone and impassioned personation, was the fiery peasant.

Brownlee, one of the most versatile and reliable of the company's stars, was a sufficiently truculent and vengeful Alfio. Miss Turner, in one of her first significant roles here, gave it character and individuality.

"Pagliacci" took fire from the outset. Warren's "Prologue," distinguished by several individual details, was sung with such a wealth of mood and style, with such superb vocalism and with such a masterful climax that it will remain in memory as the definitive pattern.

Miss Kirsten has a reedy brilliance in her voice which gave it the glitter for this role, and there was abundant fire and authority in her portrayal. Jagel, who has more and more come to the fore among the Met tenor leads, was the jealous lover and wronged husband with a cumulative force which was fearful.

Antonicelli, new to us, attained speed, character and drive. The difficult staging of the "Pagliacci" was convincingly directed by Yannopoulos.>/b>



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