[Met Performance] CID:147870
Carmen {439} Denver Auditorium, Denver, Colorado: 04/27/1948.

(Review)


Denver, Colorado
April 27, 1948


CARMEN {439}

Carmen..................Risë Stevens
Don José................Ramon Vinay
Micaela.................Claudia Pinza [Last performance]
Escamillo...............Martial Singher
Frasquita...............Thelma Votipka
Mercédès................Lucielle Browning
Remendado...............Alessio De Paolis
Dancaïre................George Cehanovsky
Zuniga..................Lorenzo Alvary
Moralès.................John Baker
Dance...................Aida Alvarez
Dance...................Leon Varkas

Conductor...............Wilfred Pelletier


Review of Cecil Effinger in the Denver Post

Famous Met Scores Success with "Carmen"
Tuesday evening brought the last of three operas presented by the Metropolitan Opera Company in its first visit to Denver. Rise Stevens was featured in the title role of Bizet's "Carmen," with Ramon Vinay as Don José. The colorful performance served as an excellent windup to what was undoubtedly a successful stand by the famous organization here.

The chances are Bizet never saw a Carmen anywhere like Rise Stevens. She is, of course, well known in the part which she does with much force and effectiveness. Her work was up to all expectations and it was her evening all the way, from the standpoint of any department.

Vinay took his time to get warmed up, which is a good idea in his tough role. He scored beautifully in his second act aria to Carmen, and the two put together an excellent last scene to bring the show to a strong finish. Much interest centered around Claudia Pinza who sang Micaela. She has a pleasing, light voice which seemed well adapted to such a part, and she received solid applause for her portrayal.

As the lieutenant, Lorenzo Alvary turned in a good supporting part. Martial Singher sang the toreador. The quintet was well handled by Thelma Votipka, Lucielle Browning, George Cehanovsky and Alessio de Paolis, and John Baker sang Morales.

Over-all this performance did not seem to have the fine edge of the other two. There were some rhythmic close-calls in the massive parts, which after all are difficult and it could well have been due to unfamiliarity with the hall. The chorus sounded well, even though things were overcrowded at times.

However, an impressive set in the last act afforded room and allowed the execution of the ballet with comparative freedom. This sort of "cadenza of the opera" was the most successful of the two days' performances. Featured as soloists to Bizet's famous dances were Aida Alvarez and Leon Varkas.

Wilfred Pelletier conducted, sharing applause with the really valuable and fine-sounding Met orchestra which contributed so much to the excellence of all three operas. With the first visit by the Metropolitan now a matter of fact, there is no question that the opera audience in this area will welcome another such visit. Perhaps new opera could be included, along with the best of some lesser known standard works. We know the performance will be good.



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