[Met Performance] CID:149650
Rigoletto {289} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/28/1949.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 28, 1949


RIGOLETTO {289}
Giuseppe Verdi--Francesco Maria Piave

Rigoletto...............Lawrence Tibbett
Gilda...................Nadine Conner
Duke of Mantua..........Giuseppe Di Stefano
Maddalena...............Lucielle Browning
Sparafucile.............Dezs÷ Ernster
Monterone...............Kenneth Schon
Borsa...................Leslie Chabay
Marullo.................George Cehanovsky
Count Ceprano...........Clifford Harvuot
Countess Ceprano........Inge Manski
Giovanna................Jean Madeira
Page....................Inge Manski

Conductor...............Pietro Cimara

Review of James Hinton Jr. in the Musical America issue of February 1949

In this fifth repetition, Lawrence Tibbett, singing his second Rigoletto of the season, brought freshly to mind what a really remarkable singing actor he is. His conception was in every way complete, and his projection of the content of the jester's character was magnificent. Whether the facet he was examining was that of buffoon, father, or avenger, his phrasing and his movement were an education in the craft of the stage.

Nadine Conner made her first appearance of the season in the part of Gilda, and gave a performance that was always sympathetic and generally secure vocally. The warmth and body of the tones in her middle register were particularly welcome in the duets in the second act and in "Tutte le feste," in the third act, where the balances were practically perfect. Giuseppe Di Stefano, as the Duke, sang with the richness of tone and the stylistic superiority that have come to be expected of him in the part; his "Parmi veder le lagrime" was especially beautiful.

Dezso Ernster sang his first Sparafucile at the Metropolitan, and contributed a sinister appearance and a correct reading of the notes. Inge Manski sang two parts-taking over the role of the Countess Ceprano from Maxine Stellman, who was indisposed, and making her first appearance as the Page in the third act. She sang the music of both with aplomb, and looked stunning in both costumes. Jean Browning-Madeira, also singing her part for the first time, was a creditable Giovanna. Lucielle Browning was the Maddalena. The rest of the cast included Kenneth Schon, George Cehanovsky, Clifford Harvuot, and Leslie Chabay. Pietro Cimara conducted as before.



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