[Met Performance] CID:16410
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg {49} Metropolitan Opera House: 02/10/1896.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
February 10, 1896
In Italian


DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG {49}
Wagner-Wagner

Hans Sachs..............Edouard de Reszke
Eva.....................Lola Beeth
Walther von Stolzing....Jean de Reszke
Magdalene...............Mathilde Bauermeister
David...................Lloyd D'Aubigné
Beckmesser..............Agostino Carbone
Pogner..................Pol Plançon
Kothner.................Giuseppe Campanari
Vogelgesang.............Roberto Vanni
Nachtigall..............Arturo Borin
Ortel...................Antonio De Vaschetti
Zorn....................Antonio Rinaldini
Moser...................Catullo Maestri
Eisslinger..............Mr. Paris [Last performance]
Foltz...................Giuseppe Cernusco
Schwarz.................Lodovico Viviani
Night Watchman..........Mr. De Longprez

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Director................William Parry

Translation by unknown

Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg received one performance this season.

Review of W. J. Henderson in The New York Times

"I MASTRI CANTORI"

Wagner's Musical Comedy Given in Italian at the Metropolitan Opera House Last Night

The only performance of "I Maestri Cantori" announced for this season was given at the Metropolitan Opera House last night. The Italian title is used advisedly, for surely no German would recognize in a presentation such as that of last night anything of the true spirit of "Die Meistersinger." To be sure, there were some conspicuous individual merits, but no amount of polished vocal delivery can atone for the woeful lack of understanding which was manifested in the work of the minor personages, and in the manner of misconducting the stage business generally. "Die Meistersinger" is an opera in which brisk movement combines with character and situation to give amusement. "I Maestri Cantori," on the other hand, is a work in which everyone sits still for fear of disturbing the singers, Apprentices, who in German, eat apples, pelt one another with the cores, make variegated trouble for David and each other, and are always active, in Italian sit fast on their benches and listen to the song birds. Men and women, who in German have a genuine street riot at the end of the second act, in Italian stand in a line and sing like a small army of wound-up marionettes. It is a great pity that no one in authority - if there is any authority - at the Metropolitan Opera house seems to comprehend the spirit of "Die Meistersinger."

Even the masters themselves lack character, and the minor ones do not even take the trouble to express surprise when Walther breaks the rules by rising to his feet when he is singing. However, one lamentable shortcoming has been removed since the last performance. There is now the much-desired ox-horn in G flat. "Die Meistersinger" is a blank desert to some without that ox-horn. Last night it performed one weird and wondrous flourish never intended for ox-horn or human ears. But it is an era of pernicious activity.

The substantial merits of last evening's performance were displayed by a very few persons. M. Jean de Reszke is a gallant knight at all times, and he sang with his customary grace and fervency in the important solos. M. Edouard de Reszke sings the music of Hans Sachs beautifully, and he has improved in his acting, which is more free and in keeping with the spirit of the part. M. Plançon sings Pogner's music well, but he makes the merchant altogether too much of a courtier. Signor Campanari deserves praise for his Kothner, and Signor Carbone, while he is not a bit Teutonic, is decidedly amusing as Beckmesser. Mr. Lloyd Daubigne has no conception of David, and the minor mastersingers were badly done. Lola Beeth is a weak and tuneless Eva. Mr. Seidl conducted last night with his customary skill, though he was forced to allow some of the singers to change some of the tempi remarkably. The audience was a large one and there was plenty of enthusiasm.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).