[Met Performance] CID:19580
Die Walküre {51} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/14/1898.

(Debuts: Anton Van Rooy, Minnie Molka-Kellogg, Katherine Fleming-Hinrichs
Reviews)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 14, 1898


DIE WALKÜRE {51}

Brünnhilde..............Lillian Nordica
Siegmund................Andreas Dippel
Sieglinde...............Emma Eames
Wotan...................Anton Van Rooy [Debut]
Fricka..................Louise Meisslinger
Hunding.................Lempriere Pringle
Gerhilde................Maud Roudez
Grimgerde...............Minnie Molka-Kellogg [Debut]
Helmwige................Olga Pevny
Ortlinde................Mathilde Bauermeister
Rossweisse..............Marthe Djella
Schwertleite............Katherine Fleming-Hinrichs [Debut]
Siegrune................Eugenia Mantelli
Waltraute...............Louise Meisslinger

Conductor...............Franz Schalk


From the review of W. J. Henderson in The New York Times

It is known...that Mr. Grau is not personally a lover of Wagner's dramas. However, he is not in the business of management to gratify his personal taste, but to make money and that is to be done only by giving the public what it likes. Whether the influential box-holders of the Opera House will tolerate the Wagner dramas when they are not used simply as vehicles for the display of M. Jean de Reszke's art is, of course, something yet to be seen. If Wagner has suddenly become fashionable, then "Die Walkure" with Andreas Dippel as Siegmund, will be welcomed again. But we have grave doubts whether "Der Ring des [Nibelungen]" would have been accorded any consideration in Fifth Avenue, if it had not already been patronized by the Mansion House and Belgravia. As for our general public, that, we know, is Wagnerian, and Mr. Grau had a taste of its hearty approval last night....

...The most important individual performance was that of Anton van Rooy as Wotan....He is a man of majestic figure, of splendid bearing, of enormous voice and intense dramatic temperament. He understands the management of his voice much better than bassos of German schooling usually do, and consequently is able to throw a great variety of light and shade into his singing. His conception of Wotan is fine, and he made a deep impression of his audience last night.


From the review of Henry Krehbiel in the New York Tribune

...the most complete illustration was found in Herr van Rooy, in whose case musical and dramatic utterance seem to be so completely merged that there is no desire in the listener to differentiate between them. Moreover, he has a beautiful voice, which he emits without effort, as if it were responsive to feeling alone, as if, indeed, it were the product of that feeling and depended neither on reflection nor will.


Photograph of Anton van Rooy as Wotan in Die Walküre by Aimé Dupont.



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