[Met Performance] CID:24000
Carmen {135} Metropolitan Opera House: 03/23/1900.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
March 23, 1900


CARMEN {135}

Carmen..................Emma Calvé
Don José................Thomas Salignac
Micaela.................Suzanne Adams
Escamillo...............Antonio Scotti
Frasquita...............Mathilde Bauermeister
Mercédès................Marie Van Cauteren
Remendado...............Auguste Queyla
Dancaïre................Eugène Dufriche
Zuniga..................Theodore Meux
Moralès.................Jacques Bars

Conductor...............Luigi Mancinelli

Director................Pierre Baudu


Unsigned review and account in The New York Times

Mme. Calvé Faints in "Carmen."

At the Metropolitan Opera House last night Bizet's opera "Carmen " was performed, and was brought to is conclusion under some difficulty. Mme. Calvé sang the title rôle, and in the first two acts seemed to be in excellent voice and spirits. Her acting was more than usually vivacious. She was, however, not in the best of condition, as afterward transpired. In the third act the fight between Don José and Escamillo was taking place, and Carmen, as usual, rushed between the combatants to separate them. Just as Mme. Calvé had performed this action she uttered a cry, and fell heavily upon the stage in a faint. The two men ran hastily to pick her up. The chorus came upon the stage, as it should have done, only to find the performance stopped.

The curtain was promptly rung down and the lights remained up, while the audience
waited patiently. Meanwhile Mme. Calvé had been carried off the stage, and Dr.
Charles Phelps, who was in the house, had been summoned to attend her. It was found that she was suffering from an ordinary faint, and would be ready to proceed in a few moments. Treasurer Max Hirsch went before the curtain and told the audience
that Mme. Calvé had fainted, but would be ready to go on in a few minutes. The curtain was soon rung up, and Mme Calvé was seen upon the stage. The audience encouraged her with hearty applause, and the act, which had been near its end, was
brought to a conclusion.

The only new feature of the performance was the appearance of Signor Scotti as Escamillo, the bull fighter. The popular baritone looked, sang, and acted the part admirably. The audience was large and enthusiastic.



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