[Met Performance] CID:256070
Elektra {56} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/2/1979.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 2, 1979


ELEKTRA {56}

Elektra.................Danica Mastilovic
Chrysothemis............Eva Marton
Klytämnestra............Mignon Dunn
Orest...................Norman Bailey
Aegisth.................Ragnar Ulfung
Overseer................Elizabeth Coss
Serving Woman...........Batyah Godfrey Ben-David
Serving Woman...........Shirley Love
Serving Woman...........Ariel Bybee
Serving Woman...........Loretta Di Franco
Serving Woman...........Alma Jean Smith
Confidant...............Suzanne Der Derian
Trainbearer.............Linda Mays
Young Servant...........Charles Anthony
Old Servant.............Edward Ghazal
Guardian................John Cheek

Conductor...............Erich Leinsdorf

Review of Robert Jacobson in Opera News

Strauss' tragedy (seen Jan. 2) has seen and heard more inspired days in recent times at the Met, for none of the principals measured up to previous interpreters. Erich Leinsdorf led an efficient, clear-cut, heartless reading - all stainless steel and Swiss watch movement, even through the recognition scene - at the same time creating such a wall of sound as to encourage his singers to sing as loudly as possible. To the tortured Elektra, Danica Mastilovic lent a hard tone that was often wobbly, edgy and astray from pitch, with little lyricism or vocal beauty, relying on harsh attacks and acting without subtlety; but she did have stamina and brute force to compensate. Her Mycenaean princess retained little nobility through dementia, alas. Eva Marton's Chrysothemis soared on top, her soprano having an interesting covered quality and strong projection, while she looked handsome. Mignon Dunn went through all the motions as the crazed Klytämnestra, but it was hard to believe her inner torture, since she appeared a kind of externalized, decaying Delilah. She did, however, vocalize it powerfully and richly. Norman Bailey's Orest spoke of nobility and sincerity, but his woolly baritone faded into the orchestral fabric, while Ragnar Ulfung's Aegisth is now agonizing to the ear.



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