[Met Performance] CID:286850
Fidelio {177} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/17/1986.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 17, 1986


FIDELIO {177}

Leonore.................Jeannine Altmeyer
Florestan...............Edward Sooter
Don Pizarro.............Siegmund Nimsgern
Rocco...................Matthias Hölle
Marzelline..............Marie McLaughlin
Jaquino.................Barry McCauley
Don Fernando............John Cheek
First Prisoner..........Thomas Booth
Second Prisoner.........James Courtney

Conductor...............Christof Perick

Review of Martin Mayer in Opera (UK)

My other venture to the Met in December was to the December 17 performance of "Fidelio." I had sold some friends on the idea of going with us to get Tennstedt and Behrens and the new tenor Robert Schenk, and we wound up with Christof Perick and Jeannine Altmeyer and Edward Sooter. The artist who got the big hand at the final curtain was Marie McLaughlin, making her Met debut this season with a Marzelline that was the best I have ever heard, rich-voiced, always musical, eagerly girlish. One notes too that Barry McCauley, also a debut artist here, sang Jaquino with just the right bright vocal quality, and that Mark Gould, who was credited in the programme, played the famous offstage trumpet call with the perfection one has come to take for granted in the Met pit.

But the substitute principals also had much to recommend them; Perick is a fine Beethoven conductor (he gave a convincing pace to the first half-hour, so hard to get right); Sooter, though he cannot dominate his aria, does nothing wrong; and Altmeyer's voice remains the excitement of this season. But she had not anticipated singing Leonore for another two weeks; she was far too nervous to get any real hope into "Komm, Hoffnung": she kept bending forward from the waist when she should just stand still, she had a kind of tic with her arms, reaching out spasmodically in time to the music, and her only idea of playing a trouser role is to keep her feet planted wide apart at all times. She is an intelligent and serious artist with a wonderful instrument, but on the evidence of this Leonore she has farther to go than I believed.



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