[Met Performance] CID:30020
Aida {76} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/27/1902.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 27, 1902


AIDA {76}
Giuseppe Verdi--Antonio Ghislanzoni

Aida....................Emma Eames
Radamès.................Emilio De Marchi
Amneris.................Carrie Bridewell, Acts I, II
Amneris.................Eugenia Mantelli, Acts III, IV [Last performance]
Amonasro................Antonio Scotti
Ramfis..................Edouard de Reszke
King....................Marcel Journet
Messenger...............Roberto Vanni
Priestess...............Marguerite Marilly

Conductor...............Luigi Mancinelli

Director................Fernand Almanz

Aida received ten performances this season.

Review in The New York Times:

An extra performance was given last evening at the Metropolitan Opera House in honor of the national holiday that attracted a considerable audience for such an occasion. 'Aida' was the bill announced for the evening, with a number of the artists in the cast who have previously co-operated in brilliant performances; but an evil star exerted its influence on the occasion. The audience as it entered was confronted by the printed announcement that Mme. Louise Homer was indisposed and that her place would be taken by Miss Carrie Bridewell; and when it got inside it was further informed that Miss Bridewell was also suffering, but consented to sing in order not to disappoint the audience, and that several large cuts would be made in the performance in consequence. These were to be especially the long duet with Aida in the second act - an excision that made a very large hole in that portion of the opera - and the duet in the prison scene in the last act, which would have left a pretty torso indeed.

The audience settled down to disappointment with some audible signs of disprobation such as are rarely heard at the Metropolitan Opera House. But in the meantime there had been a deal of scurrying about, and finally, before the curtain rose on the third act, still another announcement was made. A third representative of the part had been found and pressed into service in the person of Mme. Mantelli, familiar to the Metropoiltan audiences of previous year, but not now a member of it, who had been induced to sing so much of the role of Amneris as remained to be sung. The audience was beholden to her for leaving the sick bed of her husband for the purpose. The unlucky daughter of the King had at last found a competent interpreter who could sing the music, very little of which had been heard from Miss Bridewell, even that which she had attempted. Mme. Mantelli's performance needed no excuses in spite of the embarassing circumstances under which it was made possible.



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