[Met Performance] CID:30800
Götterdämmerung {44}
Ring Cycle [24]
Matinee ed. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania: 02/5/1903.

(Review)


Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Academy of Music
February 5, 1903 Matinee


GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG {44}
Der Ring des Nibelungen: Cycle [24]

Brünnhilde..............Lillian Nordica
Siegfried...............Alois Burgstaller
Gunther.................Adolph Mühlmann
Gutrune.................Luise Reuss-Belce
Hagen...................Robert Blass
Waltraute...............Louise Homer
Alberich................David Bispham
Woglinde................Fritzi Scheff
Wellgunde...............Carrie Bridewell
Flosshilde..............Louise Homer

Conductor...............Alfred Hertz

The scene with the three norns in the Prologue was omitted.

Review (unsigned) in a Philadelphia newspaper (unidentified)

'DIE GÖTTERDÄMMERUNG CONCLUDES THE CYCLE

Burgstaller and Nordica in a Fine Performance of Wagner's Drama.

The fine presentation of the "Nibehungen" cycle at the Academy of Music had its culmination yesterday afternoon in "Götterdämmerung," the very splendid and stirring drama of the adventures and the death of Siegfried which is the climax and the cause of the whole gigantic work. The performance was equally strong and clear with those that have preceded it and deepened the impression that has been made by all the forces engaged and especially by Mr. Hertz, who has directed the whole series with a firm intelligence, an artistic perception and a mastery of musical effect that command the highest admiration.

Burgstaller, as the more mature hero of this drama, fulfilled the expectations of his younger Siegfried. If a bit less buoyant, he was a not less engaging figure, full of enthusiasm and sentiment and he sang the music with uncommon feeling and significance. The [beginning] duet with Brünnhilde was most brilliant and he carried through the long part with an unfailing sense of its dramatic purpose and its lyrical expression. His delivery of Siegfried's narrative was poetical and beautiful and the whole effect of his work was sympathetic and satisfying.

Associated with him was Madame Nordica, whose noble Brünnhilde is now without a rival on the stage and who dissipated any fears that might have been aroused last week as to the enduring richness of her voice. In every way she gives to this fine role the utmost dignity and beauty. The other singers were not individually remarkable, but they gave a sufficiently strong and firm support to the two leading figures and the effect of the ensemble was large and noble.

The great orchestral scenes were very imposing. The Rhine journey was played with uncommon charm and to the funeral march Hertz gives most stirring accentuation. The last grand climax, the culmination of Wagner's vast orchestral imagination, was developed with an effect that could not but leave a lasting impression upon the audience that filled the house and had followed the performance for more than four hours with increasing interest.



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).