[Met Performance] CID:355140
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg {28} Amphion Academy, Brooklyn, New York: 05/17/1889.

(Review)


New York, Brooklyn
Amphion Academy
May 17, 1889


DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG {28}

Hans Sachs..............Emil Fischer
Eva.....................Félicie Kaschowska
Walther von Stolzing....Max Alvary [Last performance]
Magdalene...............Hedwig Reil
David...................Wilhelm Sedlmayer
Beckmesser..............Ludwig Mödlinger
Pogner..................Joseph Beck
Kothner.................Alois Grienauer
Vogelgesang.............Albert Mittelhauser
Nachtigall..............Jean Doré
Ortel...................Max Dörfler
Zorn....................Heinrich Bartels
Moser...................Mr. Hoppe
Eisslinger..............Hans Göttich
Foltz...................Joseph Witt [Last performance]
Schwarz.................Mr. Eiserbeck
Night Watchman..........Jean Doré

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Review (unsigned) in the Brooklyn Eagle:

GERMAN OPERA

The atmosphere of tragedy which has pervaded the Amphion Academy during the week, was dispelled last night by the refreshing breeze of Wagnerian comedy. The performance of "Die Meistersinger," with its many curious pictures of medieval life in one of the quaintest German towns was enjoyed by an audience which completely filled the building and which, judging by its enthusiasm, was keenly appreciative of the intellectual and emotional stimulus which the piece afforded.

As for artistic effort it may fairly be said that the performance came up to the highest expectations. Alvary never sang in better form. His conception of the part of Walther is exquisite in its poetic fervor and there is about it a charm of manliness and vigor. Emil Fischer sang as he always does, and if his acting were on a par with his vocal skill there would be absolutely nothing about him of which to complain. The role of Beckmesser - which was created by Wagner for the purpose of ridiculing the narrow and bigoted in art - was taken by Herr Modlinger, whose voice is somewhat harsh and grating. But he infused as much humor into the character as could well be desired. Felice Kaschoska was a pleasing, ingenuous and graceful Eva. Her treatment of the verbal and musical text showed that she is an artist of beautiful resources, and if she did not tax her voice to the full it was not because it was not under superb control. The simplicity of her Eva, combined with no small share of personal attractions, appealed at once to the sympathy and liking of the audience, and it was not one coldly critical, but rather thoroughly in harmony with the inspiration and spirit of the hour. All the other roles were in fairly good hands. Herr Mittelhauser as Vogelgesang played a voice of rare strength and compass, but his style is inelastic. It was in the last act that the finest singing was heard and the applause, even after the curtain had fallen, showed how much it was appreciated. The staging and scenic effects were excellent, and the orchestra, under the leadership of Herr Seidl, justified the conclusion that for the interpretation of Wagner it would have been difficult to enlist the services of a more competent set of musicians. Tonight, "Tannhäuser."



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