[Met Performance] CID:38180
Fedora {2} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 12/15/1906.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 15, 1906 Matinee


FEDORA {2}

Fedora Romazov..........Lina Cavalieri
Count Loris Ipanov......Enrico Caruso
Countess Olga Sukarev...Bella Alten
De Siriex...............Antonio Scotti
Desirè..................Giovanni Paroli
Dimitri.................Marie Mattfeld
Gretch..................Eugène Dufriche
Lorek...................Vittorio Navarini
Cirillo.................Bernard Bégué
Baron Rouvel............Giovanni Paroli
Dr. Borov...............Adolph Mühlmann
Boleslao Lazinski.......Tullio Voghera
Peasant Boy.............Josephine Jacoby

Conductor...............Arturo Vigna

In response to audience enthusiasm at the close of Act II, Enrico Caruso and Lina Cavalieri repeated the act's final scene.

Unsigned review in The New York Times (Aldrich?)

At the Metropolitan Opera yesterday afternoon Giordano's opera of "Fedora" was given for the second time this season with the same cast that appeared in it on the first production. Mme. Cavalieri and Messers Caruso and Scotti were the representatives of the three characters most involved in this fateful tragedy. Mme. Cavalieri is a most striking figure in it. She goes through it with an aristocratic, somewhat statuesque, grace that does not preclude her from devoting the crucial moments of tense and despairing passion with much power. Mr. Caruso has not great opportunity for his marvelous voice in this opera, but what he has he makes the most of-to the extent of repeating the ardent avowal of Ipanoff's love for Fedora at the close of the second act, as he did on the first night.

It is a positively grotesque reducto ad absurdum of the Italian. tenor's hankering for the sweets of public applause. The scene is carried through, the climax is reached after a gradual crescendo of emotional expression. The curtain falls at the psychological moment; the singers come out before it and are applauded, then retire. The audience settles itself down to conversation for the intermission -- when lo! The curtain goes up, the two characters reappear, forgetting that they have arrived at an understanding, and going back a few pages in the score, pump up the emotion and work up to the climax all over again.

What a sight it would be to see the stony gaze of Mr. Cleofonte Campanini, fixed upon the backdrop, if he were conducting for Mr. Caruso and received his signal to repeat!

But Mr. Caruso's singing of this and the few other lyric passages that fall to him in "Fedora" was of wonderful beauty and purity of tone, It and all the other excellencies of the performance were admired by a very large audience. As for the opera, it does not commend itself as one of the stronger productions of the young Italian school.



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