[Met Performance] CID:42050
La Traviata {67} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/20/1908.

(Debut: Pasquale Amato
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 20, 1908


LA TRAVIATA {67}
Giuseppe Verdi--Francesco Maria Piave

Violetta................Marcella Sembrich
Alfredo.................Enrico Caruso
Germont.................Pasquale Amato [Debut]
Flora...................Matja von Niessen-Stone
Gastone.................Angelo Badà
Baron Douphol...........Concetto Paterna
Marquis D'Obigny........Paolo Ananian
Dr. Grenvil.............Bernard Bégué
Annina..................Marie Mattfeld
Dance...................Gina Torriani

Conductor...............Francesco Spetrino

Director................Jules Speck

La Traviata received six performances this season.

Unsigned Review in the Herald

'La Traviata' at the Metropolitan Introduces Mr. Amato, an Excellent Barytone - Mme. Sembrich Reappears

Placards in the lobby of the Metropolitan Opera House last evening announced that Mr. Bonci was indisposed and that the role of Alfredo in "La Traviata" would be sung by Mr. Caruso. Any comments heard were of pleasure mingled with surprise for Mr. Caruso had already had sung three times this week.

The novelty of the evening was the first appearance here of a new Italian barytone, Mr. Pasquale Amato, who sang the role of Giorgio. He is a young man with a youthful voice, free from traces of wear and tremolo, and he displayed a fine quality of tone and received a lot of applause, some curtain calls and a big wreath. That he was nervous was to be expected, and this doubtless led to a trifling "slip" in his second act aria. But that was only in passing, and it did not mar in any way the success of his debut.

Mr. Francesco Spetrino, the conductor, also was a newcomer in the Metropolitan. He led the orchestra effectively and conscientiously.

For the rest they were familiar favorites, but how they did sing! Mme. Sembrich made her first operatic appearance of the season as Violetta, and she again warmed the audience to hearty applause by her exquisite art and beautiful voice.

And Mr. Caruso sang as if he had been resting a month. He gave forth the full volume of voice, sparing himself not at all, and he roused the crowded and brilliant audience to great applause repeatedly.



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