[Met Performance] CID:4250
Lohengrin {25} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/23/1885.

(Opening Night {3}
Edmund C. Stanton, General Manager

Debut: Albert Stritt, Emil Fischer, Alexander Alexy, Jaro Dworsky, Carl Kaufmann, Emil Sänger, Anton Seidl, Mr. Van Hell
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 23, 1885
Opening Night {3}

Edmund C. Stanton, Director of the Opera


LOHENGRIN {25}
Wagner--Wagner

Lohengrin...............Albert Stritt [Debut]
Elsa....................Auguste Seidl-Kraus
Ortrud..................Marianne Brandt
Telramund...............Adolf Robinson
King Heinrich...........Emil Fischer [Debut]
Herald..................Alexander Alexy [Debut]
Noble...................Otto Kemlitz
Noble...................Jaro Dworsky [Debut]
Noble...................Carl Kaufmann [Debut]
Noble...................Emil Sänger [Debut]

Conductor...............Anton Seidl [Debut]

Director................Mr. Van Hell [Debut]
Set Designer............Charles Fox, Jr.
Set Designer............William Schaeffer
Set Designer............Gaspar Maeder
Set Designer............Mr. Thompson
Costume Designer........D. Ascoli
Costume Designer........Henry Dazian

Lohengrin received ten performances this season.


Review of W. J. Henderson in The New York Times:

The season of grand opera in German at the Metropolitan Opera House was entered upon most auspciously. The rendering of the opera was uncommonly impressive as a whole, very striking at some stages of action, and quite free from glaring defects. Most of the performers required no introduction to the spectator. Frau Kraus has been heard already as Elsa, Fräulein Brandt as Ortrud, and Herr Robinson as Telramund, and concerning these artists it is only requisite to observe tha they renewed the agreeable impression of their earlier efforts. Herr Stritt, the latest impersonator of Lohengrin, promptly established himself in the good graces of the public. His voice is neither powerful nor vibrant, but it has the tenor timbre, is of sufficient range and quality, and its tones fall pleasantly upon the ear.

The new conductor from Munich, Herr Anton Seidl, who made his debut in the United States, is a German leader of high repute. Though still a young man, his efforts denote the possession of solid attainments, and his familiarity with the score was happily illustrated by the smoothness with which he carried out his task. The crescendo with which the swan scene and the prayer in the first act terminate, and the crescendo in the processional scene at the close of the second, were finely managed, the fortissimos being wrought up by well-nigh imperceptible gradations. Herr Seidl was summoned before the curtain after the first act; his reappearance at the end of the seond was injudicious, and prompts the suggestion that a musician of genuine talent needs no self-assertion to establish his claims in this country.


Photograph of Anton Seidl by Falk.



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