[Met Performance] CID:43870
Il Barbiere di Siviglia {70}
Cavalleria Rusticana {111}
Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 04/3/1909.

(Review)

Metropolitan Opera House
April 3, 1909 Matinee

IL BARBIERE DI SIVIGLIA {70}

Figaro..................Giuseppe Campanari
Rosina..................Bernice de Pasquali
Count Almaviva..........Alessandro Bonci
Dr. Bartolo.............Concetto Paterna
Don Basilio.............Adamo Didur
Berta...................Marie Mattfeld
Fiorello................Bernard Bégué
Sergeant................Alessandro Tretti [Last performance]

Conductor...............Francesco Spetrino

[de Pasquale sang the Valse by Venzano in the Lesson Scene in Act II]

CAVALLERIA RUSTICANA {111}

Santuzza................Emmy Destinn
Turiddu.................Enrico Caruso
Lola....................Maria Gay
Alfio...................Pasquale Amato
Mamma Lucia.............Marie Mattfeld

Conductor...............Arturo Toscanini

Review (unsigned) in The New York Times

CARUSO RETURN GREETED BY THRONG

Tenor Reappears at the Metropolitan at Close of Regular Season

CANARY BIRD SINGS A SOLO

Gift Intended for a Prima Donna Quickly Gets Into the Spirit of the Occasion

The regular subscription season of the Metropolitan Opera House came to a close yesterday afternoon with a double bill, "The Barber of Seville' and "Cavalleria Rusticana," with Bonci and Caruso in the tenor roles in the respective operas.. The return of Mr. Caruso, who has been absent three weeks owing to illness, was enthusiastically greeted. He sang in fine voice and disproved the reports that have been in circulation to the effect that it was failing. At the conclusion of "Cavalleria Rusticana" Emmy Destinn, who sang the rôle of Santuzza, shared the honors of the enthusiastic applause with Mr. Caruso.

"The Barber of Seville" was well received also, and at the close Bernice di Pasquale, who sang the rôle of Rosina received a large wreath of American Beauty roses. Attached to the center of the wreath was a small gilded bird cage containing a real canary. While the bird was being held by one of the ushers in the aisle of the prompt side of the auditorium, ready to be handed up when the curtain fell, it was so charmed by the music that it started to sing. One of the musicians had to cover the cage with his silk handkerchief to silence its solo.

According to the box office the audience in the afternoon was a record one in the history of the Metropolitan Opera House. It was estimated that there were 3,300 persons in the seats and more that 1,000 standing up. Andreas Dippel, administrative manager, said that taking all things into consideration the season had been a highly successful one. "Next Sunday we go to Chicago," said he, "and Mr. Gatti-Casazza and myself will sail for Europe in May."

With regard to Caruso's singing in "Cavalleria Rusticana," Mr. Dippel said that he sang quite in his old form, and that he had sent a telegram to Chicago earlier in the evening to reassure the people there who were afraid that they were not going to hear the great tenor this season.



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