[Met Performance] CID:46380
Il Trovatore {79} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/24/1910.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 24, 1910


IL TROVATORE {79}
Giuseppe Verdi--Salvatore Cammarano

Manrico.................Leo Slezak
Leonora.................Johanna Gadski
Count Di Luna...........Dinh Gilly
Azucena.................Louise Homer
Ferrando................Giulio Rossi
Ines....................Marie Mattfeld
Ruiz....................Giuseppe Tecchi
Gypsy...................Aristide Baracchi

Conductor...............Egisto Tango

Review in the New York Press:

TROVATORE WITH STELLAR TRIO

Three singers who have become fixed stars in the operatic firmament attracted a large audience to last night's repetition of "Trovatore" in the Metropolitan Opera House. They were Johanna Gadski, who once more appeared as Leonora; Louise Homer, who gave her familiar impersonation of Azucena, and the gigantic Leo Slezak, who, as Manrico, loomed high above his artistic companions. The other members of the cast were Dinh Gilly, a Conte di Luna fully worthy of his distinguished collaborators; Giulio Rossi, a competent Ferrando; Giuseppe Tecchi, whose sympathetic tenor voice was heard in the small role of Ruiz, and Aristide Baracchi, who embodied "Un Zingaro." Tango had charge of the orchestra.

Society was fully represented in the auditorium and some of the opinions exchanged during the intermissions in the foyer were interesting and instructive. One fair listener had observed that Slezak's legs were longer than they really ought to be, and this disturbed her aesthetic enjoyment. However, the tenor's voice and his excellent art occupied the attention of most of the audience, it may be presumed, more than considerations of his physical symmetry. He sang, it may be recorded, with his usual fire and temperament.

Johanna Gadski showed her versatility to Monday night subscribers by singing the florid music of Leonora, not only with great brilliancy, but with a flexibility of voice for which coloratura sopranos might envy her As for Louise Homer, her voice sounded so free, limpid and mellow that no one would have supposed the American contralto had quite recently been on the sick list. Evidently her attack of grip has given Mme. Homer the time for rest and recuperation she needed. These are strenuous days for a singer whose services are so much needed.



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