[Met Performance] CID:49720
Siegfried {93} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 01/14/1911.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 14, 1911 Matinee


SIEGFRIED {93}
Wagner-Wagner

Siegfried...............Carl Burrian
Brünnhilde..............Lucie Weidt [Last performance]
Wanderer................Walter Soomer
Erda....................Louise Homer
Mime....................Albert Reiss
Alberich................Otto Goritz
Fafner..................Basil Ruysdael
Forest Bird.............Bella Alten

Conductor...............Alfred Hertz

Director................Anton Schertel
Set Designer............Obronsky, Impekoven & Co.

Siegfried received two performances this season.

Unsigned review in The New York Times

"SIEGFRIED" AT THE OPERA

First Performance of Wagner's Drama with Lucy Weidt as Brünnhilde

"Siegfried" was given for the first time this season at the Metropolitan Opera House yesterday afternoon. The matinee audience was large and heard a performance that in many respects was extremely fine. There is not often a better performance of the first act heard than was given yesterday afternoon. Messers Burrian, Reiss, and Soomer, Mr. Hertz and the orchestra all seemed peculiarly well disposed and full of a mutual understanding. By the time the third act was reached, however, Mr. Hertz had been wrought up to his highest pitch of strenuosity, and there were some very crashing fortissimos of the orchestra in the introduction and in the long apostrophe that the Wanderer had put to it at moments to make it evident that he was singing at all. There was a good deal of orchestral vociferation also in the last scene between Brünnhilde and Siegfried.

This scene brought Miss Lucy Weidt before the public for the first time as the "Siegfried" Brünnhilde. She made perhaps a greater success of it than she did the Brünnhilde in "Die Walküre." She sang with power, with large and dramatic style. The voice is hardly a warm or an eloquent one, nor does Miss Weidt develop her dramatic declamation with a uniform finish of vocal style. Her stage presence in this scene was striking, and filled the eye. There might have been more tenderness and passion in her exposition of her love "the hero who has awakened her;" yet her impersonation was quite impressive, and it was intelligent and well considered.

Mr. Burrian's Siegfried, Mr. Soomer's Wanderer, Mr. Reiss' Mime, were all well known to this public. They are among the best impersonation of these characters that are now to be heard, all excellent in voice and declamation, and in dramatic effect. The first act was really noteworthy for the clearness and intelligibility of the declamation of Messers Burrian and Reiss in their several soliloquies and dialogues.>/b>



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