[Met Performance] CID:52640
United States Premiere
Le Donne Curiose {1}
Imperial Russian Ballet
. Metropolitan Opera House: 01/3/1912.
 (United States Premiere)
(Debut: Charles Hargreaves
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 3, 1912
United States Premiere


LE DONNE CURIOSE {1}
Wolf-Ferrari--Sugana

Rosaura.................Geraldine Farrar
Florindo................Hermann Jadlowker
Beatrice................Jeanne Maubourg
Lelio...................Antonio Scotti
Ottavio.................Adamo Didur
Colombina...............Bella Alten
Eleanora................Rita Fornia
Pantalone...............Antonio Pini-Corsi
Arlecchino..............Andrés De Segurola
Leandro.................Angelo Badà
Asdrubale...............Pietro Audisio
Almorò..................Lambert Murphy
Alvise..................Charles Hargreaves [Debut]
Lunardo.................Vincenzo Reschiglian
Mòmolo..................Paolo Ananian
Mènego..................Giulio Rossi
Servant.................Stefen Buckreus

Conductor...............Arturo Toscanini

Director................Anton Schertel
Set Designer............Antonio Rovescalli
Costume Designer........Caramba

Le Donne Curiose received five performances this season.


IMPERIAL RUSSIAN BALLET

DIVERTISSEMENTS


Bartley: Polka
Stanislava Kun, Geanina Mezkowskaia, Miss Schuber, Miss Zalmarna

Pas de Deux
Ekaterina Geltzer, Mikail Mordkin

Variation
Mikail Mordkin

Variation
Ekaterina Geltzer

Strauss: Polka Violette
Alina Schmolz, Alexandre Volinine

Chopin: Les Papillons
Stephania Plaskowietzkaia, Elizabeth Gluck

Russian Dance
Ekaterina Geltzer

Saint-Saëns: Gypsy Dance
Mikail Mordkin

Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2
Alina Schmolz, Stanislava Kun, Stephania Plaskowietzkaia, Geanina Mezkowskaia, Elizabeth Gluck,
Alexis Trojanowski, Kyprian Barboe, Veronine West, Franciscek Markowski, Mr. Mashat

Etude
Ekaterina Geltzer, Mikail Mordkin

Conductor...............Vittorio Podesti

Unsigned review in unidentified newspaper

Wolf-Ferrari Work Produced with Great Success Before a Brilliant Audience

Musical comedy at the Metropolitan Opera House! Not, of course, the usual slam bang, tinkling brand, but probably the most exquisite opera ever produced at the Metropolitan. Such is Mr. Ermano Wolf-Ferrari's "Le Donne Curiose" ("The Inquisite Women"), that had its first performance in America last night. The composer is on board the incoming Lusitania, rushing to New York to witness the second performance on Saturday afternoon, having unhappily missed the première. Yet his lot is not without balm, for last night Mr. Gatti-Casazza sent him a wireless dispatch - "Donne Curiose"' a great. success. Congratulations.

Half Italian and half German, the composer of this "musical comedy" has composed musical champagne that bubbles every moment with mirth and melody. The libretto, by Luigi Sugana, is fashioned after one of Carlo Goldoni's comedies of the middle of the eighteenth century. The plot is a lovely nothing - no thrills, no heart throbs - just innocent fun. In another fabled yarn it was curiosity that killed the cat; here curiosity of women gives opportunity for a sparkling libretto set to sparkling music. with a dash or two of sentiment added for "high-lights" and contrast."

Mr. Toscanini, who conducted, had spent more time in rehearsals of the work than on any of the ponderous operas that have hitherto been heard here under his baton. On the stage things went like clockwork. There are at least nine important rôles, and the artists were as near letter perfect as possible, barring some first night nervousness.

Miss Farrar Sings Well.

Miss Farrar, as Rosaura, looked charming in the quaint old costumes of the eighteenth century period, and she sang better than she had any time this season. In the first act she fondled a silken haired white dog, Buster by name, and the property of one of the ballet corps. Even Buster was in the picture, although he had not attended the final dress rehearsal.

Mr. Jadlowker was Florindo, head over Venetian heels in love, and he sang beautifully and acted the swain with many a tender sigh, tunefully expressed. The surprise of the cast was Mr. De Segurola, an artist of utmost dignity usually, but here parading in motley as the Harlequin, which he acted wonderfully well, always agile and amusing.

As the maid Colombine, beloved by the Harlequin, Mme. Bella Alten was capital: roguish, coquettish and singing excellently. Mme. Mamboing, mother of Rosaura, was admirable in acting. Mme. Fornia as Elenora was obviously nervous.Mr. Scotti as an irascible burgher was delightful; so was Mr. Didur, as another of the club's members. And credit goes also to the stage manager, Mr. Antonio Schertel.

The scenes are beautiful in detail and effect, the orchestra played wonderfully well and nothing was absent to stamp the performance as unusual. Enthusiasm was to be heard on every side in the entr'acts, but most enthusiastic of all was Mr. Otto Kahn, of the Metropolitan Board of Directors, who said: "Frankly: I've enjoyed nothing like it since "Falstaff." "If Mr. Toscanini will conduct it ten times I'll go to hear it every time, even if have to miss my trip to Europe on account of it. It is worth it."



Added Index Entries for Subjects and Names


Back to short citation(s).