[Met Performance] CID:53800
Rigoletto {78} Metropolitan Opera House: 04/2/1912.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 2, 1912


RIGOLETTO {78}
Giuseppe Verdi--Francesco Maria Piave

Rigoletto...............Pasquale Amato
Gilda...................Bernice de Pasquali
Duke of Mantua..........Enrico Caruso
Maddalena...............Maria Duchène
Sparafucile.............Adamo Didur
Monterone...............Paolo Ananian
Borsa...................Angelo Badà
Marullo.................Bernard Bégué
Count Ceprano...........Vincenzo Reschiglian
Countess Ceprano........Helen Mapleson
Giovanna................Marie Mattfeld
Page....................Emma Borniggia

Conductor...............Giuseppe Sturani

Review signed M. S. in unknown newspaper

CARUSO ENDING THE SEASON WITH HIS OLD-TIME VOICE

Tenor Now Revealing Tomes Many Admirers Thought Lost

SINGS THE DUKE IN "RIGOLETTO"

Star Has Appeared Fifty Times at $100,000 and Has Improved This Winter

Enrico Caruso is approaching the end of the present season in better vocal condition than he was in at the beginning of his long engagement. Indeed, at last night's special performance of 'Rigoletto" in the Metropolitan Opera House, which marked the great tenor's fiftieth appearance since the [first] night on November 13 last, and thus brought the pile of money he has been amassing in the space of five months to $100,000, he sang in a way comparable only to his singing when Conried used to rush out of his box in the second tier, exclaiming with gesticulatory exuberance, "The man is a god!"

For several years it seemed as if Caruso were sacrificing part of the lyric beauty of his art, which was one of the most delightful qualities, as if he were losing his grip on his exquisite mezza-voce as his voice grew more baritonal in timbre and dramatic in texture. Last night, however, he sang the Duke's Romance at the beginning of the third act, keeping his eyes closed as in the days of yore, with the same mellow beauty of voice, the same rich nasal resonance in the upper register one remembers so vividly from the past. Emphatically, Caruso's voice is rejuvenated. With such achievements as his Des Grieux in "Manon" the other day and his Duke in "Rigoletto" last night he is reaching the season's goal with flying colors.

It was a delight, too, yesterday evening to hear the title role of Verdi's melodically florescent opera not only acted - and acted with irresistible intensity and power - but actually sung. To be sure, Pasquale Amato was not in his best voice. That did not hinder him, however, from singing with tonal beauty, artistic refinement and a wealth of emotional feeling. Histrionically his portrayal of the hunchback jester certainly has undergone a marked improvement since it was heard here last.

As Gilda, Bernice di Pasquale acquitted herself in a way that met with the evident satisfaction of the audience. The prima donna has overcome largely, though not entirely, her tremolo, and she sang her "Caro Nome" very well, despite a slight tendency to sink below the correct pitch.

Maria Duchene gave an excellent performance of Maddalena, appearing for the first time in that role in the Metropolitan Opera House. Didur as Sparafucile, Marie Mattfeld as Giovanna, Ananian as Monterone, Begue as Marullo, Bada as Bosa, Reschiglian as Ceprano, Helen Mapleson as the Countess and Emma Borniggia as the Page made the cast complete. Sturani handled the directorial reins skillfully.



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