[Met Concert/Gala] CID:53970
United States Premiere
Twenty-second And Last Sunday Night Concert /
L'Orfeo {1}
Metropolitan Opera House: 04/14/1912.
 (United States Premiere)
(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
April 14, 1912

TWENTY-SECOND AND LAST SUNDAY NIGHT CONCERT

Bach/Abert: Prelude, Chorale and Fugue

Hamlet: Drinking Song
Pasquale Amato

L'Africaine: Selika's aria
Emmy Destinn

Il Barbiere di Siviglia: Largo al factotum
Pasquale Amato

Tosca: Vissi d'arte
Emmy Destinn

Die Lustigen Weiber von Windsor: Overture

Conductor...............Josef Pasternack


United States Premiere
In Concert form
In English


L'ORFEO {1}
Monteverdi-Striggio/Charles Henry Meltzer
Arrangement for modern orchestra by Professor Giacomo Orefice

Orfeo...................Hermann Weil
Euridice................Rita Fornia
Music...................Maria Duchène
Messenger...............Maria Duchène
Caronte.................Basil Ruysdael
Proserpina..............Maria Duchène
Plutone.................Herbert Witherspoon
Nymph...................Anna Case
Shepherd................Anna Case

Conductor...............Josef Pasternack [Last performance]

This was the only Metropolitan Opera performance of L'Orfeo.


Review in The New York Times:

"A PRIMITIVE OPERA HEARD
Monteverde's 'Orpheus' In Concert Form at the Metropolitan"

"The last of the Sunday night concerts at the Metropolitan Opera House was devoted to a curious and novel undertaking...A historical frame of mind, however, is not absolutely indispensable for obtaining enjoyment even from this music. Much of it is monotonous, and the obsolete forms of cadence sometimes become wearisome. But there are passages that give an impression of beauty and musical characterization to listeners of this day. Most of the instrumental preludes and interludes have melodious charm, simple though it be; and so have the choruses. The solos are largely kept in the form of a rich recitative or delamatory arioso. This verges on the modern conception of melody occasionally as in the first solo of Orpheus in the third act and in several passages of the fourth act....The piece was sung in English with a very diverse measure of success in making the words understood....The chorus sang well, and Mr. Pasternack conducted with zeal. The audience listened with amazement and with only the faintest attempts at applause."



Alternate titles: Orfeo; La Favola d'Orfeo.



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