[Met Performance] CID:54586
Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg {118} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/20/1913.

(Act III, Scene 1 omitted
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 20, 1913


DIE MEISTERSINGER VON NÜRNBERG {118}

Hans Sachs..............Hermann Weil
Eva.....................Johanna Gadski
Walther von Stolzing....Leo Slezak
Magdalene...............Marie Mattfeld
David...................Albert Reiss
Beckmesser..............Otto Goritz
Pogner..................Putnam Griswold
Kothner.................William Hinshaw
Vogelgesang.............Lambert Murphy
Nachtigall..............Gaston Martin
Ortel...................Paolo Ananian
Zorn....................Julius Bayer
Moser...................Pietro Audisio
Eisslinger..............Austin Hughes
Foltz...................Basil Ruysdael
Schwarz.................Bernhard Heidenreich
Night Watchman..........Antonio Pini-Corsi

Conductor...............Alfred Hertz

Act III, Scene 1 was omitted because of Hermann Weil's indisposition.

Review in The New York Times:

WEIL LOSES VOICE IN MEISTERSINGER
Half of Last Act of Opera Omitted, as Singer Was Able Only to Speak Lines.
NEW MAGDALENA APPEARS
Marie Mattfeld Gives an Excellent
Performance, Excelling in Teutonic Humor of Part.

Misfortune attended this season's second performance of "Die Meistersinger " at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. It came in the shape of vocal disability to Hermann Weil, who was the Hans Sachs. He was evidently in poor voice from the beginning, and in the second act his voice was in such a condition that he was singing with great effort. After a long intermission Mr. Guard of the executive staff of the house appeared before the curtain and announced that the management was in a great dilemma - that Mr. Weil had entirely lost his voice, and that, as there was no available substitute for him, it would be necessary to cut out the first scene of the third act in which Hans Sachs sings almost continuously, and go on with the last scene on the meadow outside the walls of Nuremberg.

This was accordingly done, although the loss in an artistic sense was irreparable. But the damage did not cease with this, for at the end of the act Hans Sachs has a long and important passage that is in a way the climax of the work and sums up the artistic philosophy that Wagner wished to enforce in the drama. Mr. Weil continued in the part of Hans Sachs but sang with about quarter voice, enough to deliver his speeches and allow the rest of the music to be continued to the end.

There were several changes in the cast though no new singers appeared in this performance. Mr. Slezak and Mme. Gadski were respectively the Walther von Stolzing and Eva, well remembered and admired in their impersonations of these characters. The Magdalena was Marie Mattfeld, who, in former years. had taken that part, but had not done so since the present management has ruled at the Opera House. She is an excellent Magdalena, especially in her acting and her denotement of the peculiarly Teutonic humor of the part.

It was unfortunate that this Wagnerian performance given to the Monday night subscribers should have so nearly met with shipwreck. The incident prompted several reflections. One was that the close of the comedy was so far advanced by the large excision that probably a certain number of the audience may have heard the last scene of Die Meistersinger for the first time. Another was that it was passing strange that a great operatic institution should sail so close to the wind as to have no understudy capable of taking this leading part to avoid the necessity of such an awkward contretemps.



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