[Met Performance] CID:5550
Tristan und Isolde {4} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/24/1886.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 24, 1886


TRISTAN UND ISOLDE {4}

Tristan.................Albert Niemann
Isolde..................Lilli Lehmann
Kurwenal................Adolf Robinson
Brangäne................Marianne Brandt
King Marke..............Emil Fischer
Melot...................Max Alvary
Sailor's Voice..........Max Alvary
Shepherd................Otto Kemlitz
Steersman...............Emil Sänger

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Review and comment in The New York Times:

METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE

"Tristan mid Isolde" was sung once more at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. The principal roles in the music-drama were sustained by the artists whose performances here been already described and commented upon in this place, and Herr Niemann as the hero and Fräulein Lehmann as the heroine of the story filled their respective parts, the former with the earnestness, simplicity, and dignity of delivery and bearing for which most of his efforts are conspicuous, and the latter with the vocal charm and passionate expression distinguishing, among all her efforts, her portrayal of Isolde. The second act of the music-drama, which is by far the most interesting of the three, was sung and acted with much impressiveness last night, and the beauties of the instrumentation were admirably brought forth by the band. There were three recalls for the artists after the curtain had fallen upon the passage at arms between Tristan and the faithless Melot.

GENERAL MENTION

" The Queen of Sheba" will be the opera at the Metropolitan this afternoon.

For some time past announcements of an intended season of grand opera in German, to occur in San Francisco in the Spring, and to be carried on by the Metropolitan Opera House Company from New York, have appeared in the California newspapers. They are unauthorized and unfounded in fact. The members of the Metropolitan Opera House Company are bound by their contracts to limit their performances in America to those for which they were engaged by Mr. Stanton; none of them have applied for permission to sing elsewhere; it is more than doubtful that the European engagements entered into by the principal artists would allow them to prolong their sojourn in the United States, even if they desired or were permitted to do so, and no portion of the scenery, costumes, or accessories in use, at the Metropolitan can under any circumstances be removed from the up-town house. It is desirable that a declaration of this sort should be made to prevent a misunderstanding of the situation in San Francisco - if not something worse.



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