[Met Performance] CID:5750
Fidelio {13}
Vienna Waltzes {5}
Metropolitan Opera House: 02/3/1887.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
February 3, 1887


FIDELIO {13}

Leonore.................Lilli Lehmann
Florestan...............Albert Niemann
Don Pizarro.............Adolf Robinson
Rocco...................Emil Fischer
Marzelline..............Auguste Seidl-Kraus
Jaquino.................Otto Kemlitz
Don Fernando............Rudolph Von Milde
First Prisoner..........Julius Meyer
Second Prisoner.........Emil Sänger

Conductor...............Anton Seidl


VIENNA WALTZES {5}

[Selections from the ballet Vienna Waltzes were presented to round out the evening. The program does not list the selections that were performed. For information on Vienna Waltzes see 11/19/1886]


Review in The New York Times:

METROPOLITAN OPERA. HOUSE

Last evening's performance of "Fidelio" brought to the Metropolitan Opera House the largest audience, with one exception, that has gathered to witness a representation of grand opera in German at the up-town establishment. But for the bad weather the little standing room left would undoubtedly have been filled, and as the receipts would in that case have exceeded those of the recent "Tristan" matinée, it would have been clear that if nowadays popular taste inclines considerably to Wagner, it is not wholly indifferent to Beethoven. "Fidelio" was interpreted yesterday by the artists that were last concerned in its rendering, Herr Niemann singing Florestan, Herr Fischer Rocco, Herr Robinson Pizarro, Herr Keinlitz Jaquino, Fräulein Lehmann Leonore, and Frau Seidl-Krauss Marcellina. The pathos of Herr Niemann's performance will be remembered, we fancy, when the dignity and earnestness of some of the more brilliant characters he has depicted have passed out of the beholders' memory; vocally, of course, the German tenor's portrayal is not to be referred to as either grateful or impressive. Fräulein Lehmann's Leonore was far more interesting and striking from an emotional standpoint than when first seen at the Metropolitan; in point of conception and execution, however, it is so manifestly inferior to Fräulem Brandt's, that even the temporary withdrawal of the rôle from the older artist, if not dictated by the exigencies of the répertoire, must be regarded as injudicious. The general rendering of "Fidelio" afforded, nevertheless, lively satisfaction. The singers were called before the curtain again and again. Beethoven's opera was followed by scenes from "The Vienna Waltzes," in which Mme. Cavalazzi and Fräulein Leonhardt emerged from the seclusion in which they are kept by the steady attractiveness of the "music-drama." Both "ballerine" were cordially greeted and heartily applauded.



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