[Met Performance] CID:6020
Fidelio {14} Matinee ed. Metropolitan Opera House: 11/5/1887.

(Debut: Minnie Dilthey
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 5, 1887 Matinee


FIDELIO {14}
Beethoven-Sonnleithner/Breuning/Treitschke

Leonore.................Lilli Lehmann
Florestan...............Albert Niemann
Don Pizarro.............Adolf Robinson
Rocco...................Emil Fischer
Marzelline..............Minnie Dilthey [Debut]
Jaquino.................Otto Kemlitz
Don Fernando............Rudolph Von Milde
First Prisoner..........Hans Göttich
Second Prisoner.........Emil Sänger

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Director................Theodore Habelmann
Set Designer............Charles Fox, Jr.
Set Designer............William Schaeffer

Fidelio received five performances this season.

Unsigned review in The New York Times

METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.

Beethoven's "Fidelio" is an interesting study to all who revere the genius of its great composer. Today he stands as the universal representative of the supreme height of classical orchestral music. Wagner declared that purely instrumental music reached its limit of expressiveness with Beethoven, and while none of us would sacrifice a bar of the noble symphonic works written since his time, we generally assent to Wagner's statement. Opera was distinctly not Beethoven's field, and. yet his one operatic work is nearly great. It has moments that are not surpassed, but, after all, we are compelled to admit that they are only moments. The lack of recitative unquestionably detracts much from the dramatic effect of the work. The most harsh and unsingable Wagner dialogue is preferable to spoken lines in grand opera. The illusion of musical speech must be continuous to have power. But besides this the feeling is unavoidable in listening to "Fidelio" that here Beethoven is not at his best, and the conclusion is irresistible that as music the most valuable part of "Fidelio" is found in the Leonore overtures. Nevertheless, the opera will never lack hearers, for its lofty and mournful beauties are numerous enough to hold public attention. As its central figure at the Metropolitan Opera House yesterday afternoon Lilli Lehmann repeated an impersonation of which she made this public fond last season. Her talent as an actress combines with her ability as a singer to make Leonore a romantic personage of strong attractiveness. She did not appear to be in the best of voice yesterday afternoon, but she sang with passionate fervor and stirred the large audience thoroughly. Herr Niemann was the Florestan, and he shared with Fräuleln Lehmann the honors of the afternoon. Herr Fischer sang Rocco in his customary commendable manner. Fräulein Minnie Dilthey made her first appearance with the company as Marcellina. She sang creditably, but her voice is too small for the demands of the house. The chorus sang woefully out of tune at times.



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