[Met Performance] CID:6400
Fernand Cortez {3} Metropolitan Opera House: 01/11/1888.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 11, 1888
In German


FERNAND CORTEZ {3}

Fernand Cortez..........Albert Niemann
Amazily.................Louise Meisslinger
Alvar...................Max Alvary
Télasco.................Adolf Robinson
Montézuma...............Johannes Elmblad
High Priest.............Emil Fischer
Moralès.................Rudolph Von Milde
Prisoner................Otto Kemlitz
Prisoner................Emil Sänger
Dance...................Theodora De Gillert
Dance...................Miss Louie
Dance...................Josefine Ambroggio

Conductor...............Anton Seidl

Unsigned review in The New York Times

METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.

The third performance of "Ferdinand Cortez" attracted an audience of goodly size at the Metropolitan Opera House last evening. The opera, as is common with works that have held the stage for many years, improves upon acquaintance, and there is much in it that is agreeable to both eye and ear. There is an abundance of life and movement on the stage, and the finales are stirring and brilliant. There is a fine air of barbaric splendor about the first act, and the music of this part of the opera is especially good. In the second act the ballet is one of the most delightful ever seen at the Opera House. Indeed, the spectacular display in "Cortez" is of unusual splendor. It is a feast of color and a flow of gold. Armored men, tulle-clad dancers, and prancing steeds are mingled with gilded Aztec chiefs, feathered warriors, and long-haired savage women in a manner truly dazzling. The work of the artists engaged in the presentation of the opera has altered for the better as they have gained familiarity with their rôles. Herr Niemann is, of course, an exception to this rule. His days of improvement are past. Herr Robinson, however, has increased the dramatic force of his Telasco, and last evening, being in good voice, he sang the music effectively. Fräulein Meislinger, barring her overindulgence in the tremolo, was an acceptable Amazily, and Herr Fischer sang the music of the High Priest with his usual dignified sonority. Herr Elmblad sang Montezuma too forcibly again. Herr Alvary sang badly out of tune at one time during the first act, but afterward redeemed himself. The chorus has plenty to do in "Cortez," and does it by no means badly.



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