[Met Performance] CID:6920
Faust {31} Metropolitan Opera House: 12/26/1888.

(Perotti sang the title role in Italian.
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
December 26, 1888
In German


FAUST {31}

Faust...................Julius Perotti
Marguerite..............Alma Föhström
Méphistophélès..........Emil Fischer
Valentin................Adolf Robinson
Siebel..................Félicie Kaschowska
Marthe..................Lena Göttich
Wagner..................Ludwig Mödlinger
Dance...................Etiènne Vergé
Dance...................Miss Louie
Dance...................Josefine Ambroggio

Conductor...............Walter Damrosch

[Note: Perotti, a substitution for Max Alvary, sang the title role in Italian.]

Unsigned review in The New York Times

METROPOLITAN OPERA HOUSE.

If the man who has lately been perambulating the streets of New York and shouting loudly that Italian opera is dead had walked into the Metropolitan Opera House last evening he would have stumbled over one of the most interesting corpses he ever sat up with. He would have heard the old familiar sounds, "Salve dimora, casta e pure," "Tarda si fa," "Dami ancor," and similar remarks which used to resound through the vaulted spaces of the Academy of Music in the consulship of Mapleson. The German opera season had not come to a sad and sudden end, but Herr Alvary, who was to have sung Faust, was sick, and Signor Perotti, who is by nature a Pole, and by business, at present, a German, took out naturalization papers as an Italian and sang in the vocal language. When he addressed Margaretta in the Kermese scene, and she began her reply by saying, "Non. Signor," it suddenly was revealed that the Fräulein had become Signorina Föhström for the evening, and was also warbling in Italian. Fischer, however, remained a Herr, and sang in good, guttural German; but he could not regard the proceeding as serious, and his Mephisto was an exceedingly jolly boy.

Fräulein Kaschowska, who was the Siebel, sang also in German, and so did Frau Götlich, the Martha. Herr Robinson clung to the language of the Fatherland as Valentine, but he cannot be said to have sung. Signor Perottl's Faust was a very respectable performance, but his voice was tired and he had no small difficulty at times with the troublesome notes which lie between the middle and upper registers. He sang a true high C in the "Salva dimora," but in a mixed voice. Signorina Föhström did not sing Margherita in Italian any better than she sang Margaretha in German last week. It is to be hoped that at the next presentation of this opera Mlle. Bettaque will be permitted to sing the rôle of Marguerite in French. The orchestra played the instrumental parts in the universal language of music, and Mr. Walter Damrosch conducted like a German who had been in America most of his life and spoke the language like a native. The ballet did not say a word, but it danced in pure German.



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