[Met Performance] CID:70620
Il Trittico {4}
Il Tabarro {4}
Suor Angelica {4}
Gianni Schicchi {4}
Metropolitan Opera House: 01/3/1919.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
January 3, 1919



IL TRITTICO {4}


IL TABARRO {4}

Giorgetta...............Claudia Muzio
Luigi...................Giulio Crimi
Michele.................Luigi Montesanto
Frugola.................Alice Gentle
Talpa...................Adamo Didur
Tinca...................Angelo Badà
Song Seller.............Giordano Paltrinieri
Lover...................Marie Tiffany

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni


SUOR ANGELICA {4}

Angelica................Geraldine Farrar
Princess................Flora Perini
Genovieffa..............Mary Ellis
Osmina..................Margarete Belleri
Dolcina.................Marie Mattfeld
Monitor.................Marie Sundelius
Abbess..................Rita Fornia
Head Mistress...........Cecil Arden
Lay Sister..............Marie Tiffany
Lay Sister..............Veni Warwick
Novice..................Phyllis White
Alms Collector..........Kitty Beale
Alms Collector..........Minnie Egener

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni


GIANNI SCHICCHI {4}

Gianni Schicchi.........Giuseppe De Luca
Lauretta................Florence Easton
Rinuccio................Giulio Crimi
Nella...................Marie Tiffany
Ciesca..................Marie Sundelius
Zita....................Kathleen Howard
Gherardo................Angelo Badà
Betto...................Paolo Ananian
Marco...................Louis D'Angelo
Simone..................Adamo Didur
Gherardino..............Mario Malatesta
Spinelloccio............Pompilio Malatesta
Amantio.................Andrés De Segurola
Pinellino...............Vincenzo Reschiglian
Guccio..................Carl Schlegel

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Review of Max Smith in the American

Puccini's Operatic Three Leaf Clover at Metropolitan

Puccini's operatic three-leaf clover was exhibited for the third time in the Metropolitan Opera House last night, yet already there were signs that the Italian composer's latest experiment has not caught the fancy of the public. A brand new work from the pen of the man who wrote "La Bohème," "Madama Butterfly" and "Tosca" is something surely that ought to exert an unusual attraction. But yesterday's audience did not indicate that such was the case. It was a large gathering, of course, but by no means one to overtax the capacity of the theater. Connoisseurs, moreover, could easily discern that more than a few persons had paid only their war tax.

As far as the writer has observed, however, no operas in this season's repertory are potent box-office magnets, save those in which Enrico Caruso appears. He is the only "star," it would seem, who can fill the auditorium completely; and well may the management long for the time when the demand for Wagner shall become articulate. Already voices are being heard, here and there, and before long, no doubt, Giulio Gatti-Casazza will find it feasible to give ear to the call.

Only the other day, after a performance of "Tosca," an Englishwoman, whose patriotism could not be questioned, remarked, very audibly in the foyer: "Pastry and whipped cream dainties are all very well, but one cannot subsist on such a diet forever. I have a craving for good red meat. I want to hear "Tristan und Isolde," for instance, and I think it is absolutely absurd to keep up the ban against Wagner." There is too little variety in the repertory of the Metropolitan Opera Company at present. And that is probably the reason why works which otherwise would be most acceptable are beginning to pall on the listener.

As for the three pieces heard again last night they were presented in a manner that left little to be desired, all of the principals in the casts - surely a brilliant array of artists - fulfilling their respective duties impressively. But the individual and concerted achievements of the performers could not make up for the composer's lack of spontaneity and inspiration. Only in "Gianni Schicchi" has the theatrical skill and musical dexterity of Puccini achieved notable results; and, regrettable as it may seem, the wit and charm of that fascinating comedy fails to win the full appreciation of the average devotee of grand opera. At every performance thus far have I heard people assert that they preferred "Il Tabarro" with its obvious melodramatic bombast.

Chief honors, as before, went last night to Claudia Muzio, who gave a dramatically intense portrayal of Giorgetta in "Il Tabarro;" to Gerladine Farrar, who sang and acted the part of Suor Angelica with emotional fervor and pathos; to Giuseppe de Luca, who repeated an inimitable impersonation of Gianni Schicchi; to Florence Easton, who sang the music of Gianni's daughter charmingly, coaxing much applause once more with the song, "O mio babino caro;" to Giulio Crimi, whose mellow voice lent musical distinction both to the part of Luigi in the introductory tragedy and to the part of Rinunccio in the concluding comedy; and to Adamo Didur, who gave a highly amusing embodiment as the aged Simone.

Praise also is due to others in the casts (especially to Alice Gentle for her farcical interpretation of La Frugola) and to Roberto Moranzoni who wielded the baton. Wobbly moments between singers and orchestra were more frequent, however, than at either of the two previous presentations.



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