[Met Performance] CID:79020
Lohengrin {317} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/16/1921.

(Debuts: Grace Bradley, Suzanne Keener, Grace Anthony
Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 16, 1921
In English


LOHENGRIN {317}
Wagner-Wagner

Lohengrin...............Johannes Sembach
Elsa....................Florence Easton
Ortrud..................Margarete Matzenauer
Telramund...............Clarence Whitehill
King Heinrich...........William Gustafson
Herald..................Robert Leonhardt
Page....................Grace Anthony [Debut]
Page....................Cecil Arden
Page....................Grace Bradley [Debut]
Page....................Minnie Egener
Page....................Suzanne Keener [Debut]
Page....................Alice Miriam
Page....................Myrtle Schaaf
Page....................Marie Tiffany

Conductor...............Artur Bodanzky

Director................Samuel Thewman
Designer................Joseph Urban
Translation by F. Corder, H. Corder, Cowdrey, Spaeth


[This season Wagner's opera was given both in English and in German.]


Review of Alfred Human in Musical America

'Lohengrin' in English

Mr. Gatti's Americanized edition of "Lohengrin" as revived last winter had its first hearing of the season on Wednesday evening with an unchanged cast. From the physical aspect the revival remains a complete triumph; Urban's revelry of colors and bold architecture are intriguing beyond words. The Wagner interests are not so faithfully served in the orchestra pit, obviously due to the uncompromising severity of the conductor.

The principal singers - the ever-reliable Florence Easton as Elsa, Mme. Matzenauer as Ortrud, Whitehill as Telramund - again achieved distinction in their roles; Miss Easton has never sung more gloriously, nor has Mme. Matzenauer ever demonstrated so thoroughly the richness and breadth of her art. Sembach had the disadvantage of a poor start. The Swan was compelled to listen to [his first] aria sung a good half tone off pitch. In the absence of prompt relief from the orchestra, the chorus followed Mr. Sembach's example.

The choral passages are trying even for a superlatively excellent ensemble like the Metropolitan's and it seemed apparent that Conductor Bodanzky could have piloted the chorus to the key by a judicious, amiable handling of his orchestra. But the leader appeared obdurate in this instance and in later episodes also seemed to withhold support when some of the principals wandered off the signature. Sembach sang much better after the first act, and Whitehill surpassed himself in his scene with Ortrud outside the castle. William Gustafson was the adequate King Henry; Leonhardt, in the Herald's garb, still insisted on his unique method of declaiming in a curt, explosive manner.

The sensible English translation falls pleasantly on the ears, when the singers are intelligible. Merit was acquired for clear enunciation by the principal singers with the exception of Lohengrin.



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