[Met Performance] CID:79040
Tosca {157} Metropolitan Opera House: 11/18/1921.

(Review)


Metropolitan Opera House
November 18, 1921


TOSCA {157}
Puccini-Illica/Giacosa

Tosca...................Geraldine Farrar
Cavaradossi.............Giovanni Martinelli
Scarpia.................Antonio Scotti
Sacristan...............Pompilio Malatesta
Spoletta................Giordano Paltrinieri
Angelotti...............Paolo Ananian
Sciarrone...............Louis D'Angelo
Shepherd................Myrtle Schaaf
Jailer..................Vincenzo Reschiglian

Conductor...............Roberto Moranzoni

Director................Armando Agnini
Set designer............Mario Sala

Tosca received ten performances this season.

Review of Oscar Thompson in Musical America

A Three-Star 'Tosca'

Friday evening's "Tosca"resulted in a succession of curtain calls for Geraldine Farrar, the Floria, Giovanni Martinelli, the Cavaradossi and Antonio Scotti, the Scarpia, all making their first appearances of the season. Mme. Farrar's costuming defies description. Of her acting, it must be said that it has lost none of its vivid potency and appeal. Her singing presented new points for discussion. There was much less stridency in it than has been true of the favorite soprano's vocalism in recent years. There was even an excess of easily produced mezza voce. As the result (so we are told) of recent intensive restudy, the voice has been lightened and is now a smoother and more responsive organ. But this seems to have been brought about at the expense of volume and of resonance. Additional hearings will be necessary to determine whether the change, which bears a definite promise of more artistic singing, though it has not materially altered the quality, will entail some loss of dramatic effectiveness. The "Vissi d'Arte" had all its usual intensity and abandon on this occasion. Needless to say, the stage was pelted with bouquets.

Martinelli, but recently returned from South America, sang vigorously, sometimes too much so, in the manner adored by those who hail him as the tenor to carry on the Caruso tradition. He, too, was vociferously applauded. Scotti's Scarpia, as unique as the great baritone himself is, has grown more violent in these later years, but it remains a study in villainy only equaled by the same great artist's Chim-Fang in "L'Oracolo." After the second act he shared a dozen recalls with Mme. Farrar.

Myrtle Schaaf, one of the new American girls in the company, sang the offstage music of the Shepherd prettily. Ananian, Paltrinieri, Malatesta, D'Angelo and Reschiglian were adequate in minor parts. Roberto Moranzoni conducted what was, in its entirety, an excellent performance.



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